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Conflict Activity in the Neighborhoods of Quebec City (Canada), 1989–2000

Conflict Activity in the Neighborhoods of Quebec City (Canada), 1989–2000 This research focuses on the analysis of the spatial distribution of 149 urban conflicts occurring between 1989 and 2000 in Quebec City, Canada. Specifically, the article explores the relationship between the spatial dynamics of the conflicts—in terms of frequency, duration, and intensity—and the following four dimensions of urban space: social composition; built environment; propensity to associate and to voice; and accessibility to various urban resources. The results of statistical analyses by means of a Kruskal–Wallis test and a Mann–Whitney test show, regardless of the dimension considered, to what extent certain areas are characterized by frequency, duration, or intensity of the conflict activity. Specifically, the results suggest that the degree of involvement of local people in a conflict varies very much depending on the nature of the social composition. Other findings show a relationship between areas with a high propensity to associate and to voice and a conflict activity that is more intense, more frequent, but not necessarily longer. These forms of social practices are thus testimony to the existence of know-how, i.e., a culture of conflict activity oriented towards efficiency. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy Springer Journals

Conflict Activity in the Neighborhoods of Quebec City (Canada), 1989–2000

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Social Sciences; Human Geography; Landscape/Regional and Urban Planning; Regional/Spatial Science
ISSN
1874-463X
eISSN
1874-4621
DOI
10.1007/s12061-010-9050-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This research focuses on the analysis of the spatial distribution of 149 urban conflicts occurring between 1989 and 2000 in Quebec City, Canada. Specifically, the article explores the relationship between the spatial dynamics of the conflicts—in terms of frequency, duration, and intensity—and the following four dimensions of urban space: social composition; built environment; propensity to associate and to voice; and accessibility to various urban resources. The results of statistical analyses by means of a Kruskal–Wallis test and a Mann–Whitney test show, regardless of the dimension considered, to what extent certain areas are characterized by frequency, duration, or intensity of the conflict activity. Specifically, the results suggest that the degree of involvement of local people in a conflict varies very much depending on the nature of the social composition. Other findings show a relationship between areas with a high propensity to associate and to voice and a conflict activity that is more intense, more frequent, but not necessarily longer. These forms of social practices are thus testimony to the existence of know-how, i.e., a culture of conflict activity oriented towards efficiency.

Journal

Applied Spatial Analysis and PolicySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 14, 2010

References