Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Complexity, transparency, and the warranted use of formal systems in legal factfinding

Complexity, transparency, and the warranted use of formal systems in legal factfinding Artificial Intelligence and Law 9: 189–197, 2001. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Review Essay Complexity, transparency, and the warranted use of formal systems in legal factfinding VERN R. WALKER Hofstra University School of Law, 121 Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York 10549, USA E-mail: lawvrw@hofstra.edu Joseph B. Kadane and David A. Schum, A Probabilistic Analysis of the Sacco and Vanzetti Evidence, New York: Wiley, 1996. xvi + 366 pp. (cloth). ISBN 0471-1141- Glenn Shafer, The Art of Causal Conjecture, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1996. xx + 511 pp. ISBN 0262-1936-8X. Two recent books invite us to reflect on the use of formal probability systems in legal factfinding. More generally, they make evident certain difficulties for apply- ing artificial intelligence systems in such factfinding. The two books are: Joseph B. Kadane and David A. Schum, A Probabilistic Analysis of the Sacco and Vanzetti Evidence, and Glenn Shafer, The Art of Causal Conjecture. Out of the many dif- ficulties in applying formal systems, I focus in this brief review on using them to assist factfinding in a legal context. The consideration added by this context is that a finding of fact, and the use of a formal probability http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

Complexity, transparency, and the warranted use of formal systems in legal factfinding

Artificial Intelligence and Law , Volume 9 (3) – Oct 19, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/complexity-transparency-and-the-warranted-use-of-formal-systems-in-Aod10fIIjV
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1023/A:1017909820851
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence and Law 9: 189–197, 2001. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Review Essay Complexity, transparency, and the warranted use of formal systems in legal factfinding VERN R. WALKER Hofstra University School of Law, 121 Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York 10549, USA E-mail: lawvrw@hofstra.edu Joseph B. Kadane and David A. Schum, A Probabilistic Analysis of the Sacco and Vanzetti Evidence, New York: Wiley, 1996. xvi + 366 pp. (cloth). ISBN 0471-1141- Glenn Shafer, The Art of Causal Conjecture, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1996. xx + 511 pp. ISBN 0262-1936-8X. Two recent books invite us to reflect on the use of formal probability systems in legal factfinding. More generally, they make evident certain difficulties for apply- ing artificial intelligence systems in such factfinding. The two books are: Joseph B. Kadane and David A. Schum, A Probabilistic Analysis of the Sacco and Vanzetti Evidence, and Glenn Shafer, The Art of Causal Conjecture. Out of the many dif- ficulties in applying formal systems, I focus in this brief review on using them to assist factfinding in a legal context. The consideration added by this context is that a finding of fact, and the use of a formal probability

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 19, 2004

There are no references for this article.