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Commentary on the papers of doctors elkind and abarbanel

Commentary on the papers of doctors elkind and abarbanel The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 55, No. 4, 1995 COMMENTARY ON THE PAPERS OF DOCTORS ELKIND AND ABARBANEL Edward R. Clemmens All learned professions share the problem of how to deal with incompe- tent, unethical, and even criminal conduct by their members. Most, if not all of these professions have created organizations composed of members that deal with such problems. Procedures have evolved over the years that attempt to address critical issues in a spirit of fairness and justice. Such is the case in the medical profession and in its speciality divisions. None of the systems that have been created work to perfection, certainly not to everybody's satisfaction, yet they are the best we have. These bodies are often organized as committees on ethics. Their membership usually is composed of colleagues who are widely respected for their integrity. They serve without compensation and they are expected to strictly avoid con- flicts of interest. Should a conflict arise, they are expected to resign, and they do. The two papers that I am about to discuss, address a specific problem that occasionally occurs in our field of psychoanalysis. Neither by their titles nor by intent do these papers address problems http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

Commentary on the papers of doctors elkind and abarbanel

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis , Volume 55 (4): 3 – Dec 1, 1995

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1995 Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/BF02741984
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 55, No. 4, 1995 COMMENTARY ON THE PAPERS OF DOCTORS ELKIND AND ABARBANEL Edward R. Clemmens All learned professions share the problem of how to deal with incompe- tent, unethical, and even criminal conduct by their members. Most, if not all of these professions have created organizations composed of members that deal with such problems. Procedures have evolved over the years that attempt to address critical issues in a spirit of fairness and justice. Such is the case in the medical profession and in its speciality divisions. None of the systems that have been created work to perfection, certainly not to everybody's satisfaction, yet they are the best we have. These bodies are often organized as committees on ethics. Their membership usually is composed of colleagues who are widely respected for their integrity. They serve without compensation and they are expected to strictly avoid con- flicts of interest. Should a conflict arise, they are expected to resign, and they do. The two papers that I am about to discuss, address a specific problem that occasionally occurs in our field of psychoanalysis. Neither by their titles nor by intent do these papers address problems

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 1995

Keywords: Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis

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