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Cheese in nutrition and health

Cheese in nutrition and health Cheese has a long history in the human diet. In ancient times, cheese was primarily a concentrated form of milk with the benefit of a prolonged shelf life. The high content of fat and protein in cheese made it an energy-rich and nutritious food that was suitable for our hardworking ancestors. Recent advances in nutrition science have highlighted the contribution of cheese to nutrition and health. Cheese is a rich source of essential nutrients; in particular, proteins, bioactive peptides, amino acids, fat, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. Ripened cheese is free of lactose and therefore suitable for the nutrition of lactose-intolerant individuals. There is evidence to suggest that two bioactive tripeptides, VPP and IPP, found in sour milk fermented with Lactobacillus helveticus, lower blood pressure. These peptides were also detected in specific cheese varieties in significant quantities. The high concentration of essential amino acids in cheese contributes to growth and development of the human body. Despite the presence of a notable amount of saturated and trans fatty acids, there is no clear evidence relating the consumption of cheese to any disease. Conjugated linoleic acid and sphingolipids present in cheese may have anti-carcinogenic properties. The high concentration of calcium in cheese is well known to contribute to the formation and maintenance of strong bones and teeth, but also shows a positive effect on blood pressure and helps in losing weight in combination with low-energy diets. Cheese is an important dairy product and an integral part of a healthful diet due to its substantial contribution to human health. In recent times, diet has been linked to various diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and cancer, and the focus of nutrition research has shifted towards specific food ingredients contributing to nutrition and health. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer S+B Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1051/dst:2008012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cheese has a long history in the human diet. In ancient times, cheese was primarily a concentrated form of milk with the benefit of a prolonged shelf life. The high content of fat and protein in cheese made it an energy-rich and nutritious food that was suitable for our hardworking ancestors. Recent advances in nutrition science have highlighted the contribution of cheese to nutrition and health. Cheese is a rich source of essential nutrients; in particular, proteins, bioactive peptides, amino acids, fat, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. Ripened cheese is free of lactose and therefore suitable for the nutrition of lactose-intolerant individuals. There is evidence to suggest that two bioactive tripeptides, VPP and IPP, found in sour milk fermented with Lactobacillus helveticus, lower blood pressure. These peptides were also detected in specific cheese varieties in significant quantities. The high concentration of essential amino acids in cheese contributes to growth and development of the human body. Despite the presence of a notable amount of saturated and trans fatty acids, there is no clear evidence relating the consumption of cheese to any disease. Conjugated linoleic acid and sphingolipids present in cheese may have anti-carcinogenic properties. The high concentration of calcium in cheese is well known to contribute to the formation and maintenance of strong bones and teeth, but also shows a positive effect on blood pressure and helps in losing weight in combination with low-energy diets. Cheese is an important dairy product and an integral part of a healthful diet due to its substantial contribution to human health. In recent times, diet has been linked to various diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and cancer, and the focus of nutrition research has shifted towards specific food ingredients contributing to nutrition and health.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2011

References