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Characterization of Polyurethane Foam Environmental Monitoring Tools for the Recovery and Release of Viruses

Characterization of Polyurethane Foam Environmental Monitoring Tools for the Recovery and Release... The U.S. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Preventive Controls for Human Food Rule emphasizes the importance of an effective environmental monitoring (EM) program. This study aims to characterize polyurethane foam (PUF) EM tools—currently used in the food industry for the recovery of bacteria from food contact surfaces—for their efficacy in the release and recovery of human enteric viruses. Two viruses (human norovirus [hNoV] and Tulane virus [TV]) were compared at varying inoculum levels, with two EM tools (PUF swab and sponge), two delayed processing times (24 h and 72 h), and one surface type (stainless steel [SS]). Specifically, the objectives were to (1) determine the ability of PUF devices to release viruses for detection and (2) assess the ability of PUF devices to recover viruses from SS surfaces. For TV release from the sponge, there was a significant difference (p = 0.0064) when compared across inoculum level (105 plaque forming unit [PFU]/sponge vs. 102 PFU/sponge). Release of hNoV at a single inoculum level by PUF sponge and swab was compared resulting in a significant difference (p < 0.0001). Data on recovery of TV from SS surfaces using both the sponge and swab indicate significant differences depending on the inoculum level. Recovery of hNoV from SS surfaces differed significantly (p = 0.0030) between the sponge and swab devices. Overall, the study provides a detailed characterization of two commercially available, PUF-based EM tools, and the differences identified in this study can be used to improve the efficacy of EM tools. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Environmental Virology Springer Journals

Characterization of Polyurethane Foam Environmental Monitoring Tools for the Recovery and Release of Viruses

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020
ISSN
1867-0334
eISSN
1867-0342
DOI
10.1007/s12560-020-09421-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The U.S. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Preventive Controls for Human Food Rule emphasizes the importance of an effective environmental monitoring (EM) program. This study aims to characterize polyurethane foam (PUF) EM tools—currently used in the food industry for the recovery of bacteria from food contact surfaces—for their efficacy in the release and recovery of human enteric viruses. Two viruses (human norovirus [hNoV] and Tulane virus [TV]) were compared at varying inoculum levels, with two EM tools (PUF swab and sponge), two delayed processing times (24 h and 72 h), and one surface type (stainless steel [SS]). Specifically, the objectives were to (1) determine the ability of PUF devices to release viruses for detection and (2) assess the ability of PUF devices to recover viruses from SS surfaces. For TV release from the sponge, there was a significant difference (p = 0.0064) when compared across inoculum level (105 plaque forming unit [PFU]/sponge vs. 102 PFU/sponge). Release of hNoV at a single inoculum level by PUF sponge and swab was compared resulting in a significant difference (p < 0.0001). Data on recovery of TV from SS surfaces using both the sponge and swab indicate significant differences depending on the inoculum level. Recovery of hNoV from SS surfaces differed significantly (p = 0.0030) between the sponge and swab devices. Overall, the study provides a detailed characterization of two commercially available, PUF-based EM tools, and the differences identified in this study can be used to improve the efficacy of EM tools.

Journal

Food and Environmental VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 21, 2020

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