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Characteristics of major traditional regional cheese varieties of East-Mediterranean countries: a review

Characteristics of major traditional regional cheese varieties of East-Mediterranean countries: a... Traditional cheeses represent a heritage and are the result of accumulated empirical knowledge passed on from generation to generation. Pedoclimatic conditions in most parts of the East-Mediterranean and neighbouring countries are characterised by relatively small and irregular precipitations, hot and dry summers, and a largely hilly terrain. Such environmental conditions are not very favourable for cattle but suitable for sheep and goats. Thus, the majority of traditional cheeses in these countries were — and most of them still are — made from the milk of these two animals. The relatively high ambient temperature, the lack of refrigeration facilities and the fact that most of the cheeses were produced in family enterprises or in small artisanal units led the cheese market to be dominated (> 50%) by “white brined cheeses” (WBC), which are ripened and stored under brine until consumption, e.g. Feta, Domiati and Beyaz-Peynir. WBC have no rind, no gas holes and are soft to semi-hard with an acidic (pH ∼ 4.5), salty and, some of them, piquant taste. To improve keeping quality, the drained curd of some WBC is additionally scalded at very high temperatures (90–100 °C), e.g. Halloumi and Nabulsi. Traditional cheeses of the region also include pasta filata semi-hard cheeses (e.g. Kashkaval), the curd of which after draining and acidification (pH ∼ 5.2) is subjected to a texturising process (heating, kneading and stretching at ∼ 75 °C). They usually have a flat-cylindrical shape, no holes and straw-yellow to yellow colour. Whey cheese production (e.g. Myzithra, Manouri, Lor, Anari, Urda and Skuta) was developed very early in this area, since the whey from sheep’s and goat’s milk cheese is very rich in protein. The yield can be improved if the milk of these small ruminants and/or cream is added to the whey. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Characteristics of major traditional regional cheese varieties of East-Mediterranean countries: a review

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer S+B Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1051/dst:2008023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traditional cheeses represent a heritage and are the result of accumulated empirical knowledge passed on from generation to generation. Pedoclimatic conditions in most parts of the East-Mediterranean and neighbouring countries are characterised by relatively small and irregular precipitations, hot and dry summers, and a largely hilly terrain. Such environmental conditions are not very favourable for cattle but suitable for sheep and goats. Thus, the majority of traditional cheeses in these countries were — and most of them still are — made from the milk of these two animals. The relatively high ambient temperature, the lack of refrigeration facilities and the fact that most of the cheeses were produced in family enterprises or in small artisanal units led the cheese market to be dominated (> 50%) by “white brined cheeses” (WBC), which are ripened and stored under brine until consumption, e.g. Feta, Domiati and Beyaz-Peynir. WBC have no rind, no gas holes and are soft to semi-hard with an acidic (pH ∼ 4.5), salty and, some of them, piquant taste. To improve keeping quality, the drained curd of some WBC is additionally scalded at very high temperatures (90–100 °C), e.g. Halloumi and Nabulsi. Traditional cheeses of the region also include pasta filata semi-hard cheeses (e.g. Kashkaval), the curd of which after draining and acidification (pH ∼ 5.2) is subjected to a texturising process (heating, kneading and stretching at ∼ 75 °C). They usually have a flat-cylindrical shape, no holes and straw-yellow to yellow colour. Whey cheese production (e.g. Myzithra, Manouri, Lor, Anari, Urda and Skuta) was developed very early in this area, since the whey from sheep’s and goat’s milk cheese is very rich in protein. The yield can be improved if the milk of these small ruminants and/or cream is added to the whey.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2011

References