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Cellular immunotherapy for cancer. Past, present, future

Cellular immunotherapy for cancer. Past, present, future editorial memo (2012) 5:81–84 DOI 10.1007/s12254-012-0023-2 Cellular immunotherapy for cancer. Past, present, future Alexandros Spyridonidis Received: 5 March 2012 / Accepted: 22 May 2012 / Published online: 19 June 2012 © Springer-Verlag Wien 2012 Alexandros Spyridonidis The first steps towards cellular immunotherapy (GvHD) compared with those free of GvHD, induction for cancer of remission in patients after withdrawal of immunosup- pression, and higher relapse rates in recipients receiving The notion that immunocompetent cells, contained wit- T-cell depleted grafts compared with unmanipulated hin adult bone marrow or peripheral blood, are capable grafts [6–8]. The first patient to receive adoptive T-cell of mediating an antitumor effect was first validated expe- immunotherapy was a boy with acute lymphoblastic rimentally in 1957 by Barnes [1]. In these experiments, leukemia (ALL) who relapsed after bone marrow trans- leukemic animals that were lethally irradiated and plantation and obtained a sustained complete remission reconstituted with allogeneic marrow had a lower tumor of his disease by receiving multiple transfusions of lym- burden following transplantation than similarly treated phocytes from his sister, the original bone marrow donor animals that were reconstituted with syngeneic marrow. [9]. Kolb et al. [10] validated the efficacy of this appro- This immunologic antitumor effect http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png memo - Magazine of European Medical Oncology Springer Journals

Cellular immunotherapy for cancer. Past, present, future

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Oncology
ISSN
1865-5041
eISSN
1865-5076
DOI
10.1007/s12254-012-0023-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

editorial memo (2012) 5:81–84 DOI 10.1007/s12254-012-0023-2 Cellular immunotherapy for cancer. Past, present, future Alexandros Spyridonidis Received: 5 March 2012 / Accepted: 22 May 2012 / Published online: 19 June 2012 © Springer-Verlag Wien 2012 Alexandros Spyridonidis The first steps towards cellular immunotherapy (GvHD) compared with those free of GvHD, induction for cancer of remission in patients after withdrawal of immunosup- pression, and higher relapse rates in recipients receiving The notion that immunocompetent cells, contained wit- T-cell depleted grafts compared with unmanipulated hin adult bone marrow or peripheral blood, are capable grafts [6–8]. The first patient to receive adoptive T-cell of mediating an antitumor effect was first validated expe- immunotherapy was a boy with acute lymphoblastic rimentally in 1957 by Barnes [1]. In these experiments, leukemia (ALL) who relapsed after bone marrow trans- leukemic animals that were lethally irradiated and plantation and obtained a sustained complete remission reconstituted with allogeneic marrow had a lower tumor of his disease by receiving multiple transfusions of lym- burden following transplantation than similarly treated phocytes from his sister, the original bone marrow donor animals that were reconstituted with syngeneic marrow. [9]. Kolb et al. [10] validated the efficacy of this appro- This immunologic antitumor effect

Journal

memo - Magazine of European Medical OncologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 19, 2012

References