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Cancer Care Continuum Research and Educational Innovation: Are Academic Internists Keeping up with Population Trends?

Cancer Care Continuum Research and Educational Innovation: Are Academic Internists Keeping up... Academic internists play a unique role in conducting innovative research, developing educational curricula, and influencing policy. As the population of patients living with and beyond cancer is expected to reach 22 million by 2030, it is essential for academic internists to lead innovative research in clinical care and medical education across the cancer care continuum. We characterized cancer-related topics presented at the 2015–2019 annual meetings of the Society of General Internal Medicine, a national organization of over 3,000 academic general internists. We analyzed all scientific (n = 3,437), Innovation in Medical Education (n = 756), and Innovation in Clinical Practice (n = 664) abstracts for content across the cancer continuum: prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and palliative/end-of-life care (P/EOL). Of 3,437 scientific abstracts, 304 (8.8%) related to cancer. Prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and P/EOL were addressed in 52 (17.1%), 145 (47.7%), 18 (5.9%), 57 (18.8%), 12 (4.0%), and 29 (9.5%) of scientific abstracts, respectively. Some addressed multiple phases, and 6 were classified as “other.” Breast (mean = 18.2, SD = 4.66), colorectal (mean = 12.8, SD = 3.11), and lung (mean = 8.2, SD = 2.29) cancers were most presented in scientific abstracts per year. Five (0.66%) of the 756 Innovation in Medical Education abstracts and 41 (6.2%) of the 665 Innovation in Clinical Practice abstracts addressed cancer. Similarly, they primarily focused on screening and prevention. To lead innovation in clinical care, education, and policy across the cancer continuum and prepare the future workforce, academic internists should expand their focus to later phases, particularly survivorship and P/EOL. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

Cancer Care Continuum Research and Educational Innovation: Are Academic Internists Keeping up with Population Trends?

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © American Association for Cancer Education 2021
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-021-02073-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Academic internists play a unique role in conducting innovative research, developing educational curricula, and influencing policy. As the population of patients living with and beyond cancer is expected to reach 22 million by 2030, it is essential for academic internists to lead innovative research in clinical care and medical education across the cancer care continuum. We characterized cancer-related topics presented at the 2015–2019 annual meetings of the Society of General Internal Medicine, a national organization of over 3,000 academic general internists. We analyzed all scientific (n = 3,437), Innovation in Medical Education (n = 756), and Innovation in Clinical Practice (n = 664) abstracts for content across the cancer continuum: prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and palliative/end-of-life care (P/EOL). Of 3,437 scientific abstracts, 304 (8.8%) related to cancer. Prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and P/EOL were addressed in 52 (17.1%), 145 (47.7%), 18 (5.9%), 57 (18.8%), 12 (4.0%), and 29 (9.5%) of scientific abstracts, respectively. Some addressed multiple phases, and 6 were classified as “other.” Breast (mean = 18.2, SD = 4.66), colorectal (mean = 12.8, SD = 3.11), and lung (mean = 8.2, SD = 2.29) cancers were most presented in scientific abstracts per year. Five (0.66%) of the 756 Innovation in Medical Education abstracts and 41 (6.2%) of the 665 Innovation in Clinical Practice abstracts addressed cancer. Similarly, they primarily focused on screening and prevention. To lead innovation in clinical care, education, and policy across the cancer continuum and prepare the future workforce, academic internists should expand their focus to later phases, particularly survivorship and P/EOL.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 2023

Keywords: Cancer; Care continuum; Primary care; Medical education

References