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Book Reviews

Book Reviews The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 59, No. 3, 1999 Edited by Robin Steier Goldberg, Ph.D. Open Minded, by Jonathan Lear, Harvard University Press, 1998, 345 ps. It is a delight when a writer capable in two fields is able to rub them together to illuminate. It is likely that in each field fresh insights can be produced by the simul- taneity, and additionally it is possible that something entirely new will occur between the fields. In my experience this happens more readily during interplay between psychoanalysis and sciences such as anthropology, biology, and develop- mental psychology. In this volume real excitement is generated by a writer who is a working philosopher and a practicing psychoanalyst, and whose work in each dis- cipline is informed by his dual professional identity. Work of Plato, Aristotle, Wittgenstein, and others is laid out as an ongoing exam- ination of various psychological issues, including transference, psychic structure, and unconscious conflict. Interwoven with this is the work of analysts, including most prominently Freud and Hans Loewald, Lear's particular mentor. Lear writes well, and one finds oneself in awe, reflecting on early striving and achieving in the ancient inquiries into the nature of the mind. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
Subject
Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1023/A:1021469611596
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 59, No. 3, 1999 Edited by Robin Steier Goldberg, Ph.D. Open Minded, by Jonathan Lear, Harvard University Press, 1998, 345 ps. It is a delight when a writer capable in two fields is able to rub them together to illuminate. It is likely that in each field fresh insights can be produced by the simul- taneity, and additionally it is possible that something entirely new will occur between the fields. In my experience this happens more readily during interplay between psychoanalysis and sciences such as anthropology, biology, and develop- mental psychology. In this volume real excitement is generated by a writer who is a working philosopher and a practicing psychoanalyst, and whose work in each dis- cipline is informed by his dual professional identity. Work of Plato, Aristotle, Wittgenstein, and others is laid out as an ongoing exam- ination of various psychological issues, including transference, psychic structure, and unconscious conflict. Interwoven with this is the work of analysts, including most prominently Freud and Hans Loewald, Lear's particular mentor. Lear writes well, and one finds oneself in awe, reflecting on early striving and achieving in the ancient inquiries into the nature of the mind.

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

References