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Book Review: The Dynamics of Judicial Proof. Computation, Logic, and Common Sense

Book Review: The Dynamics of Judicial Proof. Computation, Logic, and Common Sense Artificial Intelligence and Law 11: 299–303, 2003. Book review M. MacCrimmon and P. Tillers (eds.), The Dynamics of Judicial Proof. Computation, Logic, and Common Sense, Physica-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2002, 494 pp. (ISBN 3-79081-459-8) Research on legal evidence addresses topics like burden of proof, permissible types of evidence, witness testimonies, the role of probability estimates, justification and the law of evidence. What can be learnt about the process of judicial proof using artificial intelligence techniques? Peter Tillers wanted to find answers to this question when he started to organize a workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Proof (as part of the Second World Conference on New Trends in Criminal Investigation and Evidence). It took place in Amsterdam in December 1999 and attracted researchers with a variety of backgrounds. In April 2000, Peter Tillers organized a similar event in cooperation with Marilyn MacCrimmon, the Artificial Intelligence and Judicial Proof Symposium in New York. The book under review here is the result of these academic meetings. It fits in nicely with the recent attention for legal evidence in the field of artificial intelligence and law, as exemplified by the special issue of Artificial Intelligence and Law (2001, Volume 9, Nos. 2–3) and the ICAIL http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

Book Review: The Dynamics of Judicial Proof. Computation, Logic, and Common Sense

Artificial Intelligence and Law , Volume 11 (4) – Nov 7, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1023/B:ARTI.0000046021.87243.06
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence and Law 11: 299–303, 2003. Book review M. MacCrimmon and P. Tillers (eds.), The Dynamics of Judicial Proof. Computation, Logic, and Common Sense, Physica-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2002, 494 pp. (ISBN 3-79081-459-8) Research on legal evidence addresses topics like burden of proof, permissible types of evidence, witness testimonies, the role of probability estimates, justification and the law of evidence. What can be learnt about the process of judicial proof using artificial intelligence techniques? Peter Tillers wanted to find answers to this question when he started to organize a workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Proof (as part of the Second World Conference on New Trends in Criminal Investigation and Evidence). It took place in Amsterdam in December 1999 and attracted researchers with a variety of backgrounds. In April 2000, Peter Tillers organized a similar event in cooperation with Marilyn MacCrimmon, the Artificial Intelligence and Judicial Proof Symposium in New York. The book under review here is the result of these academic meetings. It fits in nicely with the recent attention for legal evidence in the field of artificial intelligence and law, as exemplified by the special issue of Artificial Intelligence and Law (2001, Volume 9, Nos. 2–3) and the ICAIL

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 7, 2004

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