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Book Review

Book Review Artificial Intelligence and Law (2006) 14: 241–246  Springer 2006 DOI 10.1007/s10506-006-9018-9 Douglas Walton, Abductive reasoning, The University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, 2004, 303 pp., 1. Abduction (Logic) and 2. Reasoning Abduction is an old topic, even Aristotle wrote about it, but because of a corrupt translation, abduction as a word and phenomenon was for a long time not well understood. Abductive reasoning belongs to a set of arguments such as presumptive and plausible arguments. Most of methodological works however were based on a logical approach. What is new in current research is that abduction stays in the traditional logical area and invades also other fields like theory of argumentation and computing. More and more, tools and software help to build and validate new types of representation of knowledge and reasoning in the field of practical argumentation. This book is an example of this extension of the field concerned. Douglas Walton already published a lot of books on reasoning. He was recently working on dialogue-based theory of argumentation in which inferences are chained together to aim at a final conclusion. In a previous paper (2000), he suggested that Wigmore’s argument diagramming (1913) can be modeled by new dialogical models http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1007/s10506-006-9018-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence and Law (2006) 14: 241–246  Springer 2006 DOI 10.1007/s10506-006-9018-9 Douglas Walton, Abductive reasoning, The University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, 2004, 303 pp., 1. Abduction (Logic) and 2. Reasoning Abduction is an old topic, even Aristotle wrote about it, but because of a corrupt translation, abduction as a word and phenomenon was for a long time not well understood. Abductive reasoning belongs to a set of arguments such as presumptive and plausible arguments. Most of methodological works however were based on a logical approach. What is new in current research is that abduction stays in the traditional logical area and invades also other fields like theory of argumentation and computing. More and more, tools and software help to build and validate new types of representation of knowledge and reasoning in the field of practical argumentation. This book is an example of this extension of the field concerned. Douglas Walton already published a lot of books on reasoning. He was recently working on dialogue-based theory of argumentation in which inferences are chained together to aim at a final conclusion. In a previous paper (2000), he suggested that Wigmore’s argument diagramming (1913) can be modeled by new dialogical models

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 9, 2007

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