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Book Review

Book Review Artificial Intelligence and Law (2006) 14: 247–248  Springer 2007 DOI 10.1007/s10506-006-9020-2 David R. Koepsell, The Ontology of Cyberspace – Law, Philosophy and the future of Intellectual Property Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago 2000, Price $26.95 As someone who in the past few years has been involved in the development of an ontology to model financial fraud in Europe, I was excited to be asked to review David Koepsell’s book on the ontology of cyberspace. As well as having an interest in intellectual property, I was looking forward to learning in detail, about legal ontologies. Unfortunately I was to be greatly disappointed. The first three chapters are devoted to legal ontologies. However, the discussion is solely focused on jurisprudential issues. There is no mention of the numerous systems built by Breuker, Winkels and others at the University of Amsterdam (CLIME, E-Power and E-Court), the research of Bench- Capon and others at the University of Liverpool and the fact that currently research in Legal Ontologies is being conducted in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States. Workshops and conferences have been held in Melbourne (1997), Amsterdam (2001) Edinburgh (2003) and Bologna (2005). In Chapter http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1007/s10506-006-9020-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence and Law (2006) 14: 247–248  Springer 2007 DOI 10.1007/s10506-006-9020-2 David R. Koepsell, The Ontology of Cyberspace – Law, Philosophy and the future of Intellectual Property Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago 2000, Price $26.95 As someone who in the past few years has been involved in the development of an ontology to model financial fraud in Europe, I was excited to be asked to review David Koepsell’s book on the ontology of cyberspace. As well as having an interest in intellectual property, I was looking forward to learning in detail, about legal ontologies. Unfortunately I was to be greatly disappointed. The first three chapters are devoted to legal ontologies. However, the discussion is solely focused on jurisprudential issues. There is no mention of the numerous systems built by Breuker, Winkels and others at the University of Amsterdam (CLIME, E-Power and E-Court), the research of Bench- Capon and others at the University of Liverpool and the fact that currently research in Legal Ontologies is being conducted in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States. Workshops and conferences have been held in Melbourne (1997), Amsterdam (2001) Edinburgh (2003) and Bologna (2005). In Chapter

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 20, 2007

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