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Bi- and Multi-directional Gene Transfer in the Natural Populations of Polyvalent Bacteriophages, and Their Host Species Spectrum Representing Foodborne Versus Other Human and/or Animal Pathogens

Bi- and Multi-directional Gene Transfer in the Natural Populations of Polyvalent Bacteriophages,... Unraveling the trends of phage-host versus phage-phage coevolution is critical for avoiding possible undesirable outcomes from the use of phage preparations intended for therapeutic, food safety or environmental safety purposes. We aimed to investigate a phenomenon of intergeneric recombination and its trajectories across the natural populations of phages predominantly linked to foodborne pathogens. The results from the recombination analyses, using a large array of the recombination detection algorithms imbedded in SplitsTree, RDP4, and Simplot software packages, provided strong evidence (fit: 100; P  ≤ 0.014) for both bi- and multi-directional intergeneric recombination of the genetic loci involved collectively in phage morphogenesis, host specificity, virulence, replication, and persistence. Intergeneric recombination was determined to occur not only among conspecifics of the virulent versus temperate phages but also between the phages with these different lifestyles. The recombining polyvalent phages were suggested to interact with fairly large host species networks, including sometimes genetically very distinct species, such as e.g., Salmonella enterica and/or Escherichia coli versus Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Further studies are needed to understand whether phage-driven intergeneric recombination can lead to undesirable changes of intestinal and other microbiota in humans and animals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Environmental Virology Springer Journals

Bi- and Multi-directional Gene Transfer in the Natural Populations of Polyvalent Bacteriophages, and Their Host Species Spectrum Representing Foodborne Versus Other Human and/or Animal Pathogens

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC part of Springer Nature 2021
ISSN
1867-0334
eISSN
1867-0342
DOI
10.1007/s12560-021-09460-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Unraveling the trends of phage-host versus phage-phage coevolution is critical for avoiding possible undesirable outcomes from the use of phage preparations intended for therapeutic, food safety or environmental safety purposes. We aimed to investigate a phenomenon of intergeneric recombination and its trajectories across the natural populations of phages predominantly linked to foodborne pathogens. The results from the recombination analyses, using a large array of the recombination detection algorithms imbedded in SplitsTree, RDP4, and Simplot software packages, provided strong evidence (fit: 100; P  ≤ 0.014) for both bi- and multi-directional intergeneric recombination of the genetic loci involved collectively in phage morphogenesis, host specificity, virulence, replication, and persistence. Intergeneric recombination was determined to occur not only among conspecifics of the virulent versus temperate phages but also between the phages with these different lifestyles. The recombining polyvalent phages were suggested to interact with fairly large host species networks, including sometimes genetically very distinct species, such as e.g., Salmonella enterica and/or Escherichia coli versus Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Further studies are needed to understand whether phage-driven intergeneric recombination can lead to undesirable changes of intestinal and other microbiota in humans and animals.

Journal

Food and Environmental VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 23, 2021

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