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Bernard Robertson and G. A. [Tony] Vignaux, Interpreting Evidence: Evaluating Forensic Science in the Courtroom.

Bernard Robertson and G. A. [Tony] Vignaux, Interpreting Evidence: Evaluating Forensic Science in... Artificial Intelligence and Law 9: 215–217, 2001. Book Review Bernard Robertson and G. A. [Tony] Vignaux, Interpreting Evidence: Evaluating Forensic Science in the Courtroom. Chicester: Wiley, 1995. xxi + 240 pp. (hard cover). ISBN 0471-9602-68. 1. Overview Interpreting Evidence: Evaluating Forensic Science in the Courtroom is a book with an important agenda – to improve the interpretation of expert testimony, evidence, and their accumulation in the courtroom. The suggested methodology is the Bayesian theory of evidence, a system well understood by the mathematical community, but which has yet to gain widespread acceptance in court. The book is aimed mostly at forensic scientists and people in the legal profes- sion. It presents a well-considered account of why existing methods of presenting testimony are lacking, and how many of these problems are alleviated simply by using Bayesian conditioning. The book’s style is easily readable, even to people with lack of formal mathematical background, and yet is sufficiently precise to avoid muddling the issues it discusses. As such, it meets its intended goals: on the one hand, it ought to be educational to forensic scientists, in how to present testimony in a useful manner, that legal professionals can better understand and trust. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

Bernard Robertson and G. A. [Tony] Vignaux, Interpreting Evidence: Evaluating Forensic Science in the Courtroom.

Artificial Intelligence and Law , Volume 9 (3) – Oct 19, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1023/A:1017961821760
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence and Law 9: 215–217, 2001. Book Review Bernard Robertson and G. A. [Tony] Vignaux, Interpreting Evidence: Evaluating Forensic Science in the Courtroom. Chicester: Wiley, 1995. xxi + 240 pp. (hard cover). ISBN 0471-9602-68. 1. Overview Interpreting Evidence: Evaluating Forensic Science in the Courtroom is a book with an important agenda – to improve the interpretation of expert testimony, evidence, and their accumulation in the courtroom. The suggested methodology is the Bayesian theory of evidence, a system well understood by the mathematical community, but which has yet to gain widespread acceptance in court. The book is aimed mostly at forensic scientists and people in the legal profes- sion. It presents a well-considered account of why existing methods of presenting testimony are lacking, and how many of these problems are alleviated simply by using Bayesian conditioning. The book’s style is easily readable, even to people with lack of formal mathematical background, and yet is sufficiently precise to avoid muddling the issues it discusses. As such, it meets its intended goals: on the one hand, it ought to be educational to forensic scientists, in how to present testimony in a useful manner, that legal professionals can better understand and trust.

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 19, 2004

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