Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Barriers and Facilitators to Stool-Based Screening for Colorectal Cancer Among Black Louisville Residents

Barriers and Facilitators to Stool-Based Screening for Colorectal Cancer Among Black Louisville... Knowledge of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening options remains suboptimal in Black populations, contributing to screening disparities. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we partnered with five Black churches in Louisville, a region of Kentucky with high Black-white CRC screening disparities, to explore screening barriers and facilitators for CRC education and outreach. Project champions (n = 5) served as primary points of contact, developed project support within their churches, and were trained to recruit church and community members (n = 39) to participate in five semi-structured focus groups. Interview questions probed actual and perceived barriers to CRC screening, focusing on knowledge and perceptions of stool-based tests. Subsequent questions explored perceptions of different screening tests, CRC knowledge and beliefs, and trusted community locations for screening outreach. Transcripts were analyzed iteratively, and codes were derived inductively and refined to develop overarching themes. Participants experienced multilevel barriers to completing CRC screening. Primary themes about CRC screening included acknowledgment of importance, positive and negative personal experiences, need for increased outreach, and desire for greater cultural representation in educational materials. Participants frequently discussed perceptions of inadequate medical care, with most having only ever been offered colonoscopy; subsequently, knowledge of stool-based tests was low. To address this knowledge gap, participants stressed interpersonal communication from trusted individuals, such as local Black medical providers and CRC survivors. Given the low knowledge of stool-based testing among participants and identified inequities in receipt of clinical care, community-based CRC screening interventions are warranted to reduce Black-white CRC screening disparities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

Barriers and Facilitators to Stool-Based Screening for Colorectal Cancer Among Black Louisville Residents

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/barriers-and-facilitators-to-stool-based-screening-for-colorectal-QYVuT8B244
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) under exclusive licence to American Association for Cancer Education 2022. Springer Nature or its licensor (e.g. a society or other partner) holds exclusive rights to this article under a publishing agreement with the author(s) or other rightsholder(s); author self-archiving of the accepted manuscript version of this article is solely governed by the terms of such publishing agreement and applicable law.
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-022-02231-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Knowledge of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening options remains suboptimal in Black populations, contributing to screening disparities. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we partnered with five Black churches in Louisville, a region of Kentucky with high Black-white CRC screening disparities, to explore screening barriers and facilitators for CRC education and outreach. Project champions (n = 5) served as primary points of contact, developed project support within their churches, and were trained to recruit church and community members (n = 39) to participate in five semi-structured focus groups. Interview questions probed actual and perceived barriers to CRC screening, focusing on knowledge and perceptions of stool-based tests. Subsequent questions explored perceptions of different screening tests, CRC knowledge and beliefs, and trusted community locations for screening outreach. Transcripts were analyzed iteratively, and codes were derived inductively and refined to develop overarching themes. Participants experienced multilevel barriers to completing CRC screening. Primary themes about CRC screening included acknowledgment of importance, positive and negative personal experiences, need for increased outreach, and desire for greater cultural representation in educational materials. Participants frequently discussed perceptions of inadequate medical care, with most having only ever been offered colonoscopy; subsequently, knowledge of stool-based tests was low. To address this knowledge gap, participants stressed interpersonal communication from trusted individuals, such as local Black medical providers and CRC survivors. Given the low knowledge of stool-based testing among participants and identified inequities in receipt of clinical care, community-based CRC screening interventions are warranted to reduce Black-white CRC screening disparities.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 27, 2022

Keywords: Colorectal cancer; Screening; Stool-based screening; African Americans

References