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Bacterial-Based Methods for Cancer Treatment: What We Know and Where We Are

Bacterial-Based Methods for Cancer Treatment: What We Know and Where We Are A severe disease, cancer is caused by the exponential and uncontrolled growth of cells, leading to organ dysfunction as well as disorders. This disease has been recognized as one of the significant challenges to health and medicine. Various treatment procedures for cancer are associated with diverse side effects; the most conventional cancer treatments include chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy, among others. Numerous adverse and side effects, low specificity and sensitivity, narrow therapeutic windows, and, recently, the emergence of tumor cells resistant to such treatments have been documented as the shortcomings of conventional treatment strategies. As a group of prokaryotic microorganisms, bacteria have great potential for use in cancer therapy. Currently, utilizing bacteria for cancer treatment has attracted the attention of scientists. The high potential of bacteria to become non-pathogenic by genetic manipulation, their distinguished virulence factors (which can be used as weapons against tumors), their ability to proliferate in tissues, and the contingency to control their population by administrating antibiotics, etc., have made bacteria viable candidates and live micro-medication for cancer therapies. However, the possible cytotoxicity impacts of bacteria, their inability to entirely lyse cancerous cells, as well as the probability of mutations in their genomes are among the significant challenges of bacteria-based methods for cancer treatment. In this article, various available data on bacterial therapeutics, along with their pros and cons, are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oncology and Therapy Springer Journals

Bacterial-Based Methods for Cancer Treatment: What We Know and Where We Are

Oncology and Therapy , Volume 10 (1) – Jun 1, 2022

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2021
ISSN
2366-1070
eISSN
2366-1089
DOI
10.1007/s40487-021-00177-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A severe disease, cancer is caused by the exponential and uncontrolled growth of cells, leading to organ dysfunction as well as disorders. This disease has been recognized as one of the significant challenges to health and medicine. Various treatment procedures for cancer are associated with diverse side effects; the most conventional cancer treatments include chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy, among others. Numerous adverse and side effects, low specificity and sensitivity, narrow therapeutic windows, and, recently, the emergence of tumor cells resistant to such treatments have been documented as the shortcomings of conventional treatment strategies. As a group of prokaryotic microorganisms, bacteria have great potential for use in cancer therapy. Currently, utilizing bacteria for cancer treatment has attracted the attention of scientists. The high potential of bacteria to become non-pathogenic by genetic manipulation, their distinguished virulence factors (which can be used as weapons against tumors), their ability to proliferate in tissues, and the contingency to control their population by administrating antibiotics, etc., have made bacteria viable candidates and live micro-medication for cancer therapies. However, the possible cytotoxicity impacts of bacteria, their inability to entirely lyse cancerous cells, as well as the probability of mutations in their genomes are among the significant challenges of bacteria-based methods for cancer treatment. In this article, various available data on bacterial therapeutics, along with their pros and cons, are discussed.

Journal

Oncology and TherapySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2022

Keywords: Bacterial therapeutics; Bacteriotherapy; Cancer treatment; Immunotherapy; Microbial metabolites; Multimodal therapies

References