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Association Between the Use of Non-benzodiazepine Hypnotics and Cognitive Outcomes: A Systematic Review

Association Between the Use of Non-benzodiazepine Hypnotics and Cognitive Outcomes: A Systematic... Purpose of ReviewAdverse effects of sedative-hypnotic medications on cognition are concerning. Past studies have examined benzodiazepine (BZD) use and cognitive outcomes; however, few studies have examined newer non-BZD hypnotic agents (nBHs; e.g., zolpidem). This systematic review examined observational studies assessing the association between nBH use and cognitive outcomes.Recent FindingsFive studies met eligibility requirements and were included in the review. Most studies did not find an association between nBH use and dementia diagnosis; however, we found no studies assessing other cognitive outcomes such as cognitive performance (e.g., word recall tasks). Characterization of nBH use mostly consisted of incident new use; one study assessed nBH dosing; none examined duration of use. Studies included were of strong quality.SummaryThis review found no association between nBH use and dementia diagnosis, although there is a need for more research on more cognitive outcomes and nBH use patterns. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sleep Medicine Reports Springer Journals

Association Between the Use of Non-benzodiazepine Hypnotics and Cognitive Outcomes: A Systematic Review

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020
eISSN
2198-6401
DOI
10.1007/s40675-020-00163-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of ReviewAdverse effects of sedative-hypnotic medications on cognition are concerning. Past studies have examined benzodiazepine (BZD) use and cognitive outcomes; however, few studies have examined newer non-BZD hypnotic agents (nBHs; e.g., zolpidem). This systematic review examined observational studies assessing the association between nBH use and cognitive outcomes.Recent FindingsFive studies met eligibility requirements and were included in the review. Most studies did not find an association between nBH use and dementia diagnosis; however, we found no studies assessing other cognitive outcomes such as cognitive performance (e.g., word recall tasks). Characterization of nBH use mostly consisted of incident new use; one study assessed nBH dosing; none examined duration of use. Studies included were of strong quality.SummaryThis review found no association between nBH use and dementia diagnosis, although there is a need for more research on more cognitive outcomes and nBH use patterns.

Journal

Current Sleep Medicine ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 28, 2020

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