Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Assessment of the Applicability of Capsid-Integrity Assays for Detecting Infectious Norovirus Inactivated by Heat or UV Irradiation

Assessment of the Applicability of Capsid-Integrity Assays for Detecting Infectious Norovirus... Human noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. In the absence of a practical culture technique for routine analysis of infectious noroviruses, several methods have been developed to discriminate between infectious and non-infectious viruses by removing non-viable viruses prior to analysis by RT-qPCR. In this study, two such methods (RNase and porcine gastric mucin) which were designed to remove viruses with compromised capsids (and therefore assumed to be non-viable), were assessed for their ability to quantify viable F-specific RNA bacteriophage (FRNAP) and human norovirus following inactivation by UV-C or heat. It was found that while both methods could remove a proportion of non-viable viruses, a large proportion of non-viable virus remained to be detected by RT-qPCR, leading to overestimations of the viable population. A model was then developed to determine the proportion of RT-qPCR detectable RNA from non-viable viruses that must be removed by such methods to reduce overestimation to acceptable levels. In most cases, nearly all non-viable virus must be removed to reduce the log overestimation of viability to within levels that might be considered acceptable (e.g. below 0.5 log10). This model could be applied when developing alternative pre-treatment methods to determine how well they should perform to be comparable to established infectivity assays. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Environmental Virology Springer Journals

Assessment of the Applicability of Capsid-Integrity Assays for Detecting Infectious Norovirus Inactivated by Heat or UV Irradiation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/assessment-of-the-applicability-of-capsid-integrity-assays-for-X93znV5Q06
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by UK Crown
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Food Science; Chemistry/Food Science, general
ISSN
1867-0334
eISSN
1867-0342
DOI
10.1007/s12560-019-09390-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Human noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. In the absence of a practical culture technique for routine analysis of infectious noroviruses, several methods have been developed to discriminate between infectious and non-infectious viruses by removing non-viable viruses prior to analysis by RT-qPCR. In this study, two such methods (RNase and porcine gastric mucin) which were designed to remove viruses with compromised capsids (and therefore assumed to be non-viable), were assessed for their ability to quantify viable F-specific RNA bacteriophage (FRNAP) and human norovirus following inactivation by UV-C or heat. It was found that while both methods could remove a proportion of non-viable viruses, a large proportion of non-viable virus remained to be detected by RT-qPCR, leading to overestimations of the viable population. A model was then developed to determine the proportion of RT-qPCR detectable RNA from non-viable viruses that must be removed by such methods to reduce overestimation to acceptable levels. In most cases, nearly all non-viable virus must be removed to reduce the log overestimation of viability to within levels that might be considered acceptable (e.g. below 0.5 log10). This model could be applied when developing alternative pre-treatment methods to determine how well they should perform to be comparable to established infectivity assays.

Journal

Food and Environmental VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2019

References