Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Ascertaining Suspected Wildlife Trade from Detained Parcels Under International Shipment

Ascertaining Suspected Wildlife Trade from Detained Parcels Under International Shipment Wildlife hunting has been in practice since the colonial phase of India which caused a great loss to the nation’s biodiversity. In last few years, several incidences have been reported where live animals and their parts and products were confiscated from the international airports being shipped to meet the emerging demand of wildlife in grey market. Several wild animals have been in a constant demand following the belief that wildlife and its parts have the potential to cure several ailments. In this study, we investigated two detained parcels confiscated by the Customs Authority in the suspicion of illegal wildlife trade containing mysterious animal products of wild origin. The parcels were in transit and were being shipped via air-mail to the United States of America from the Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose International Airport, Kolkata, India. We sequenced the partial fragments of cytochrome b gene and surprisingly, the confiscated specimens showed a 99% homology with the known sequences of Oriental house rat (Rattus tanezumi). On phylogenetic analysis, the confiscated specimens clustered with the known sequences Rattus tanezumi with 100% bootstrap support. These specimens also showed least genetic divergence (DA 0.003–0.013) with Rattus tanezumi, thus identified specimens to be originated from Oriental house rat. This study has proven the imperativeness of the molecular diagnostics tools in ascertaining the species identity from morphologically disfigured and unrecognisable specimens. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Proceedings of the Zoological Society Springer Journals

Ascertaining Suspected Wildlife Trade from Detained Parcels Under International Shipment

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/ascertaining-suspected-wildlife-trade-from-detained-parcels-under-W4N85s6LRt
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Zoological Society, Kolkata, India 2019
Subject
Life Sciences; Life Sciences, general; Zoology; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Biodiversity; Conservation Biology/Ecology
ISSN
0373-5893
eISSN
0974-6919
DOI
10.1007/s12595-019-00312-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Wildlife hunting has been in practice since the colonial phase of India which caused a great loss to the nation’s biodiversity. In last few years, several incidences have been reported where live animals and their parts and products were confiscated from the international airports being shipped to meet the emerging demand of wildlife in grey market. Several wild animals have been in a constant demand following the belief that wildlife and its parts have the potential to cure several ailments. In this study, we investigated two detained parcels confiscated by the Customs Authority in the suspicion of illegal wildlife trade containing mysterious animal products of wild origin. The parcels were in transit and were being shipped via air-mail to the United States of America from the Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose International Airport, Kolkata, India. We sequenced the partial fragments of cytochrome b gene and surprisingly, the confiscated specimens showed a 99% homology with the known sequences of Oriental house rat (Rattus tanezumi). On phylogenetic analysis, the confiscated specimens clustered with the known sequences Rattus tanezumi with 100% bootstrap support. These specimens also showed least genetic divergence (DA 0.003–0.013) with Rattus tanezumi, thus identified specimens to be originated from Oriental house rat. This study has proven the imperativeness of the molecular diagnostics tools in ascertaining the species identity from morphologically disfigured and unrecognisable specimens.

Journal

Proceedings of the Zoological SocietySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 11, 2020

References