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Anti-fatigue effect of yak milk powder in mouse model

Anti-fatigue effect of yak milk powder in mouse model It has been speculated that the adaptation of Tibetan residents for high altitude and oxygen-deficient environment might be associated with their long-term consumption of yak milk. In order to verify the hypothesis, the anti-fatigue effect of yak milk powder (YMP) was investigated after oral treatment for 5 weeks in mouse model using forced swimming test. The results showed that the forced swimming time of YMP groups was increased by 46–112% in a dose-dependent manner. The content of hepatic glycogen was increased by 26–40% and the level of serum triglyceride was decreased by 30%; the exercise-induced accumulations of blood lactic acid and serum urea nitrogen were lower in YMP groups than in the control group. In addition, compared with the control group, YMP groups had lower glutamic oxalacetic transaminase and lactic dehydrogenase levels. It could be concluded that yak milk could increase an endurance capacity and alleviate fatigue. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Anti-fatigue effect of yak milk powder in mouse model

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by INRA and Springer-Verlag France
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1007/s13594-014-0198-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It has been speculated that the adaptation of Tibetan residents for high altitude and oxygen-deficient environment might be associated with their long-term consumption of yak milk. In order to verify the hypothesis, the anti-fatigue effect of yak milk powder (YMP) was investigated after oral treatment for 5 weeks in mouse model using forced swimming test. The results showed that the forced swimming time of YMP groups was increased by 46–112% in a dose-dependent manner. The content of hepatic glycogen was increased by 26–40% and the level of serum triglyceride was decreased by 30%; the exercise-induced accumulations of blood lactic acid and serum urea nitrogen were lower in YMP groups than in the control group. In addition, compared with the control group, YMP groups had lower glutamic oxalacetic transaminase and lactic dehydrogenase levels. It could be concluded that yak milk could increase an endurance capacity and alleviate fatigue.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 4, 2014

References