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An Inquiry into Cancer-Related Knowledge, Understanding, and Health-Seeking Behavior of Men Living in South Africa

An Inquiry into Cancer-Related Knowledge, Understanding, and Health-Seeking Behavior of Men... In 2018, we conducted a survey among a convenience sample of men (n = 205) living in a resource-poor, semi-urban community in South Africa. We aimed to describe what they know about cancer by asking questions about cancer-related knowledge and understanding, and health-seeking behavior. We also investigated possible relationships between the variables. We used a researcher-administered questionnaire to collect the data and descriptive statistics and quantitative content analyses for the analysis. Chi-square was used to examine the relationships. The mean age of the sample was 35 years, and 49.8% (n = 102) attended 11 or 12 years of school. One-third (32.7%; n = 67) indicated they knew what cancer was, but only 28.8% (n = 59) gave an explanation: “very dangerous/a killer/worse than HIV” were the most common explanations. Only 24.9% (n = 51) were able to identify a possible warning sign, and “feeling very sick” was the most common. However, more than 60% considered six of the seven warning signs of cancer as serious. When suspecting they might have cancer, most (77%; n = 159) indicated they would tell the preferred person within 1 week, while 5.9% (n = 12) would tell “nobody.” Although the majority (52.2%; n = 107) felt their partners and families motivated them to seek healthcare when sick, 28.3% (n = 58) needed permission to consult a professional. Educating the community about cancer in a culturally sensitive manner, irrespective of their educational level and perceived knowledge of cancer, could improve knowledge and understanding and lead to seeking healthcare timely. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

An Inquiry into Cancer-Related Knowledge, Understanding, and Health-Seeking Behavior of Men Living in South Africa

Journal of Cancer Education , Volume 37 (6): 6 – Dec 1, 2022

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © American Association for Cancer Education 2021
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-021-02052-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 2018, we conducted a survey among a convenience sample of men (n = 205) living in a resource-poor, semi-urban community in South Africa. We aimed to describe what they know about cancer by asking questions about cancer-related knowledge and understanding, and health-seeking behavior. We also investigated possible relationships between the variables. We used a researcher-administered questionnaire to collect the data and descriptive statistics and quantitative content analyses for the analysis. Chi-square was used to examine the relationships. The mean age of the sample was 35 years, and 49.8% (n = 102) attended 11 or 12 years of school. One-third (32.7%; n = 67) indicated they knew what cancer was, but only 28.8% (n = 59) gave an explanation: “very dangerous/a killer/worse than HIV” were the most common explanations. Only 24.9% (n = 51) were able to identify a possible warning sign, and “feeling very sick” was the most common. However, more than 60% considered six of the seven warning signs of cancer as serious. When suspecting they might have cancer, most (77%; n = 159) indicated they would tell the preferred person within 1 week, while 5.9% (n = 12) would tell “nobody.” Although the majority (52.2%; n = 107) felt their partners and families motivated them to seek healthcare when sick, 28.3% (n = 58) needed permission to consult a professional. Educating the community about cancer in a culturally sensitive manner, irrespective of their educational level and perceived knowledge of cancer, could improve knowledge and understanding and lead to seeking healthcare timely.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Cancer knowledge; Health-seeking behavior; Men; South Africa

References