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Addressing Breast Cancer Disparities by Improving Diversity of the Oncology Workforce

Addressing Breast Cancer Disparities by Improving Diversity of the Oncology Workforce Purpose of ReviewWhile breast cancer mortality continues to decline, improvements in survival have not been equal across racial and ethnic groups. Indeed, breast cancer mortality is estimated to be over 40% higher among Black women relative to White women. With socioeconomic and biological factors, structural racism, and access to care all implicated in breast cancer disparities, there has been increased attention given the diversity of the oncology workforce. The medical workforce, particularly in oncology, does not adequately represent this increasingly diverse population of the USA. This article explores the intersection of breast cancer disparities and diversity within the oncology workforce and offers insight into current initiatives designed to increase physician diversity and, in turn, breast cancer outcomes.Recent FindingsRacial and gender diversity in the oncology workforce remains elusive. Yet, studies demonstrate that minority patients benefit from racially concordant care in terms of adherence, access to care, and higher quality of care.SummaryEfforts need to be made to diversity the oncologic workforce to improve access and quality of care. Strategies such as mentorship, attention to bias, and efforts to reduce attrition at all levels of training along with policies and targeted interventions will help mitigate disparities and improve patient outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Breast Cancer Reports Springer Journals

Addressing Breast Cancer Disparities by Improving Diversity of the Oncology Workforce

Current Breast Cancer Reports , Volume OnlineFirst – Aug 3, 2022

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2022. Springer Nature or its licensor holds exclusive rights to this article under a publishing agreement with the author(s) or other rightsholder(s); author self-archiving of the accepted manuscript version of this article is solely governed by the terms of such publishing agreement and applicable law.
ISSN
1943-4588
eISSN
1943-4596
DOI
10.1007/s12609-022-00456-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of ReviewWhile breast cancer mortality continues to decline, improvements in survival have not been equal across racial and ethnic groups. Indeed, breast cancer mortality is estimated to be over 40% higher among Black women relative to White women. With socioeconomic and biological factors, structural racism, and access to care all implicated in breast cancer disparities, there has been increased attention given the diversity of the oncology workforce. The medical workforce, particularly in oncology, does not adequately represent this increasingly diverse population of the USA. This article explores the intersection of breast cancer disparities and diversity within the oncology workforce and offers insight into current initiatives designed to increase physician diversity and, in turn, breast cancer outcomes.Recent FindingsRacial and gender diversity in the oncology workforce remains elusive. Yet, studies demonstrate that minority patients benefit from racially concordant care in terms of adherence, access to care, and higher quality of care.SummaryEfforts need to be made to diversity the oncologic workforce to improve access and quality of care. Strategies such as mentorship, attention to bias, and efforts to reduce attrition at all levels of training along with policies and targeted interventions will help mitigate disparities and improve patient outcomes.

Journal

Current Breast Cancer ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 3, 2022

Keywords: Diversity; Workforce; Oncology; Healthcare delivery; Breast cancer

References