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A Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Research in Japan

A Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Research in Japan Artificial Intelligence and Law 5: 75–76, 1997. 75 A Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Research in Japan Guest Editors: Katsumi Nitta and Hajime Yoshino Editorial Introduction This symposium was planned to introduce research activities on AI and Law in Japan. It includes five papers. Research into AI and Law in Japan began in 1980, when Hajime Yoshino (Meiji Gakuin University) started the A-project. Since then, he has recruited sev- eral lawyers and computer scientists, and developed some legal reasoning systems which handle the civil code. His research activities gained a high evaluation rating, with the result that the Ministry of Education and Science decided to support his ‘Legal Expert’ project for five years (1993–1998). Currently, about 30 lawyers and 10 computer scientists have joined the project and have developed legal reason- ing systems. The main research objective has been to develop logic-based legal knowledge bases. Yoshino selected the United Nations Convention for Internation- al Sales of Goods (CISG) as the target domain, to maximise the possibilities for international collaboration. Further research arose from the Fifth Generation Computer Systems Project (1982–1995), which developed a wide range of logic-based parallel processing technologies from hardware to application software. While working for the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

A Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Research in Japan

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1023/A:1008256621864
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence and Law 5: 75–76, 1997. 75 A Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Research in Japan Guest Editors: Katsumi Nitta and Hajime Yoshino Editorial Introduction This symposium was planned to introduce research activities on AI and Law in Japan. It includes five papers. Research into AI and Law in Japan began in 1980, when Hajime Yoshino (Meiji Gakuin University) started the A-project. Since then, he has recruited sev- eral lawyers and computer scientists, and developed some legal reasoning systems which handle the civil code. His research activities gained a high evaluation rating, with the result that the Ministry of Education and Science decided to support his ‘Legal Expert’ project for five years (1993–1998). Currently, about 30 lawyers and 10 computer scientists have joined the project and have developed legal reason- ing systems. The main research objective has been to develop logic-based legal knowledge bases. Yoshino selected the United Nations Convention for Internation- al Sales of Goods (CISG) as the target domain, to maximise the possibilities for international collaboration. Further research arose from the Fifth Generation Computer Systems Project (1982–1995), which developed a wide range of logic-based parallel processing technologies from hardware to application software. While working for the

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 19, 2004

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