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A review of the additive manufacturing (3DP) of bioceramics: alumina, zirconia (PSZ) and hydroxyapatite

A review of the additive manufacturing (3DP) of bioceramics: alumina, zirconia (PSZ) and... The additive manufacturing of bioceramic parts has been investigated since the 1980s. This paper offers an overview of the present achievements in the production of alumina, zirconia and hydroxyapatite parts by means of selective laser sintering/melting of a powder bed or stereolithography. A focus is placed on these specific materials because of their widespread use in the biomedical field. It demonstrates that even though the manufacturing of parts with these processes is possible from pure bioceramics, the use of a binder (or another chemical adjuvant) is required in order to achieve good mechanical properties. Still, improvements in the raw material preparation and in the comprehension of the physical phenomena occurring during the processing remain necessary to be able to prevent the formation of cracks or to be able to control the porosity of the parts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Australian Ceramic Society Springer Journals

A review of the additive manufacturing (3DP) of bioceramics: alumina, zirconia (PSZ) and hydroxyapatite

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Australian Ceramic Society
Subject
Materials Science; Ceramics, Glass, Composites, Natural Materials; Materials Engineering; Inorganic Chemistry
ISSN
2510-1560
eISSN
2510-1579
DOI
10.1007/s41779-016-0003-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The additive manufacturing of bioceramic parts has been investigated since the 1980s. This paper offers an overview of the present achievements in the production of alumina, zirconia and hydroxyapatite parts by means of selective laser sintering/melting of a powder bed or stereolithography. A focus is placed on these specific materials because of their widespread use in the biomedical field. It demonstrates that even though the manufacturing of parts with these processes is possible from pure bioceramics, the use of a binder (or another chemical adjuvant) is required in order to achieve good mechanical properties. Still, improvements in the raw material preparation and in the comprehension of the physical phenomena occurring during the processing remain necessary to be able to prevent the formation of cracks or to be able to control the porosity of the parts.

Journal

Journal of the Australian Ceramic SocietySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 13, 2016

References