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A qualitative study of work-life choices in academic internal medicine

A qualitative study of work-life choices in academic internal medicine The high attrition rate of female physicians pursuing an academic medicine research career has not been examined in the context of career development theory. We explored how internal medicine residents and faculty experience their work within the context of their broader life domain in order to identify strategies for facilitating career advancement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 18 residents and 34 faculty members representing male and female physicians at different career stages. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: (1) the love of being a physician (“Raison d’être”), (2) family obligations (“2nd Shift”), and (3) balancing work demands with non-work life (“Negotiating Academic Medicine”). Female researchers and educators reported more strategies for multiple role planning and management than female practitioners. Interventions aimed at enhancing academic internists’ planning and self-efficacy for multiple role management should be investigated as a potential means for increasing participation and facilitate advancement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Health Sciences Education Springer Journals

A qualitative study of work-life choices in academic internal medicine

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Education; Medical Education
ISSN
1382-4996
eISSN
1573-1677
DOI
10.1007/s10459-013-9457-5
pmid
23605099
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The high attrition rate of female physicians pursuing an academic medicine research career has not been examined in the context of career development theory. We explored how internal medicine residents and faculty experience their work within the context of their broader life domain in order to identify strategies for facilitating career advancement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 18 residents and 34 faculty members representing male and female physicians at different career stages. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: (1) the love of being a physician (“Raison d’être”), (2) family obligations (“2nd Shift”), and (3) balancing work demands with non-work life (“Negotiating Academic Medicine”). Female researchers and educators reported more strategies for multiple role planning and management than female practitioners. Interventions aimed at enhancing academic internists’ planning and self-efficacy for multiple role management should be investigated as a potential means for increasing participation and facilitate advancement.

Journal

Advances in Health Sciences EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 20, 2013

References