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A holistic (horney) approach to the schizophrenias

A holistic (horney) approach to the schizophrenias Part III -- THE THERAPEUTIC PROCESS JACK L. RUBINS LTHOUGH there is an abundant justment or resocialization, rather than literature on the psychoanalysis of the slower and deeper but more perm- the schizophrenias, most of it deals with anent personality change. Insted, many theoretical concepts, which I have dis- potential psychotherapists are focusing cussed in my previous papers (1, 2). on behavior therapy, group or encounter Relatively few analysts have actually therapy, drug therapy or direct environ- attempted to treat these conditions, and mental manipulation; and the psychia- even fewer have described their tech- trist becomes a social interventionist niques and results in detail. For some rather than being concerned with dyn- classical analysts this reluctance is a amic, intrapsychic phenomena. carry-over from Freud's position that In any event, the present consensus schizophrenics "become inaccessible among many psychiatrists and psycho- to the influence of psychoanalysis and analysts is still that the therapeutic results of analysis and/or analytically- cannot be cured by our efforts. ''3 Other analysts have been deterred by practical oriented psychotherapy are equivocal. difficulties supposedly inherent in the The question has been raised as to what psychoses themselves. Among these extent positive results of psychoanalysis have been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

A holistic (horney) approach to the schizophrenias

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis , Volume 32 (1): 27 – Mar 1, 1972

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1972 The Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/BF01872481
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Part III -- THE THERAPEUTIC PROCESS JACK L. RUBINS LTHOUGH there is an abundant justment or resocialization, rather than literature on the psychoanalysis of the slower and deeper but more perm- the schizophrenias, most of it deals with anent personality change. Insted, many theoretical concepts, which I have dis- potential psychotherapists are focusing cussed in my previous papers (1, 2). on behavior therapy, group or encounter Relatively few analysts have actually therapy, drug therapy or direct environ- attempted to treat these conditions, and mental manipulation; and the psychia- even fewer have described their tech- trist becomes a social interventionist niques and results in detail. For some rather than being concerned with dyn- classical analysts this reluctance is a amic, intrapsychic phenomena. carry-over from Freud's position that In any event, the present consensus schizophrenics "become inaccessible among many psychiatrists and psycho- to the influence of psychoanalysis and analysts is still that the therapeutic results of analysis and/or analytically- cannot be cured by our efforts. ''3 Other analysts have been deterred by practical oriented psychotherapy are equivocal. difficulties supposedly inherent in the The question has been raised as to what psychoses themselves. Among these extent positive results of psychoanalysis have been

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1972

Keywords: Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis

References