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A Descriptive Study of Vehicle Classwise Headways using Mixed Traffic Data

A Descriptive Study of Vehicle Classwise Headways using Mixed Traffic Data This paper illustrates an investigation of vehicle classwise headways under mixed traffic. Based on field experiments conducted on Indian highways, the study reveals that traffic composition and lead–lag vehicle combination collectively affect drivers’ behaviour in choosing headways. The field survey indicates that highway through traffic primarily comprised trucks and cars. Accordingly, the study considered four-vehicle pair combinations: ‘truck–truck’, ‘truck–car’, ‘car–car’ and ‘car–truck’. It performed investigations across three different traffic mixes characterized by the 20% heavy vehicles and 15, 10 and 5% three-wheeled vehicles share in composition. Experiments show an increase in the probability of shorter headways when the share of three-wheeled vehicles in traffic upturns resulting in the frequent formation of platoons. An inspection of results indicates that such probability is relatively high for car–car combination, whereas it was least mainly due to size and vehicle dynamics for truck–truck. Often truck drivers’ keep relatively shorter headways and exhibit different driving psychology while following a car. On the other hand, car drivers prefer to keep adequate headway while following a truck except when slower vehicles, including motorized/non-motorized three-wheeled ones in traffic, are insignificant. Passing opportunities increase largely in such a situation, prompting them to move with shorter headways while taking overtaking decisions, even if the lead vehicle is a truck. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of The Institution of Engineers (India):Series A Springer Journals

A Descriptive Study of Vehicle Classwise Headways using Mixed Traffic Data

Journal of The Institution of Engineers (India):Series A , Volume 103 (4) – Dec 1, 2022

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Institution of Engineers (India) 2022
ISSN
2250-2149
eISSN
2250-2157
DOI
10.1007/s40030-022-00666-w
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper illustrates an investigation of vehicle classwise headways under mixed traffic. Based on field experiments conducted on Indian highways, the study reveals that traffic composition and lead–lag vehicle combination collectively affect drivers’ behaviour in choosing headways. The field survey indicates that highway through traffic primarily comprised trucks and cars. Accordingly, the study considered four-vehicle pair combinations: ‘truck–truck’, ‘truck–car’, ‘car–car’ and ‘car–truck’. It performed investigations across three different traffic mixes characterized by the 20% heavy vehicles and 15, 10 and 5% three-wheeled vehicles share in composition. Experiments show an increase in the probability of shorter headways when the share of three-wheeled vehicles in traffic upturns resulting in the frequent formation of platoons. An inspection of results indicates that such probability is relatively high for car–car combination, whereas it was least mainly due to size and vehicle dynamics for truck–truck. Often truck drivers’ keep relatively shorter headways and exhibit different driving psychology while following a car. On the other hand, car drivers prefer to keep adequate headway while following a truck except when slower vehicles, including motorized/non-motorized three-wheeled ones in traffic, are insignificant. Passing opportunities increase largely in such a situation, prompting them to move with shorter headways while taking overtaking decisions, even if the lead vehicle is a truck.

Journal

Journal of The Institution of Engineers (India):Series ASpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Headway distributions; Vehicle classwise headways; Mixed traffic; Goodness of fit

References