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Special Section Guest Editorial:Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images

Special Section Guest Editorial:Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists... Elizabeth A. Krupinski Elizabeth A. Krupinski, "Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images," J. Med. Imag. 3(1), 011001 (2016), doi: 10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.011001. Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images Elizabeth A. Krupinski Emory University Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences 1364 Clifton Road NE Atlanta, Georgia 30322 E-mail: ekrupin@emory.edu It is often said that the practice of medicine is both art and science. The interpretation of medical images (e.g., radiology, pathology, cardiology, telemedicine) is no exception and perhaps is even the paragon of this duality. At one level the science part seems obvious--the functioning and capabilities of the human visual system are well known and characterized, as are the basic characteristics, features, and appearance of lesions and other abnormalities in images. Just look for those features and the diagnosis is made. Unfortunately it is not that easy. According to the Institute of Medicine Committee on Quality of Health Care in America, at least 98,000 people die each year from medical errors.1 Image interpretation accounts for a good number of those errors. In fact, error rates in radiology (both false negatives and false positives) have been estimated to be as high as 30% in some areas. An analysis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Imaging SPIE

Special Section Guest Editorial:Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images

Journal of Medical Imaging , Volume 3 (1) – Jan 1, 2016

Special Section Guest Editorial:Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images


Elizabeth A. Krupinski Elizabeth A. Krupinski, "Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images," J. Med. Imag. 3(1), 011001 (2016), doi: 10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.011001. Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images Elizabeth A. Krupinski Emory University Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences 1364 Clifton Road NE Atlanta, Georgia 30322 E-mail: ekrupin@emory.edu It is often said that the practice of medicine is both art and science. The interpretation of medical images (e.g., radiology, pathology, cardiology, telemedicine) is no exception and perhaps is even the paragon of this duality. At one level the science part seems obvious--the functioning and capabilities of the human visual system are well known and characterized, as are the basic characteristics, features, and appearance of lesions and other abnormalities in images. Just look for those features and the diagnosis is made. Unfortunately it is not that easy. According to the Institute of Medicine Committee on Quality of Health Care in America, at least 98,000 people die each year from medical errors.1 Image interpretation accounts for a good number of those errors. In fact, error rates in radiology (both false negatives and false positives) have been estimated to be as high as 30% in some areas. An analysis of the frequency of radiologic image interpretation in the United States a few years back estimated that medical perception and interpretation events occurred at a rate of more than 1 per second.2 There are well over a billion radiology exams conducted every year and that number is growing. There is no doubt that medical imaging plays a vital role in today's health care system, but like all areas it is not perfect. Errors are made and patient care is impacted on a daily basis. To some extent, that is where the art of interpretation comes into play. Image interpretation is more than just looking for predefined features and calling...
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Publisher
SPIE
Copyright
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Subject
Special Section on Medical Image Perception and Observer Performance; Paper
ISSN
2329-4302
eISSN
2329-4310
DOI
10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.011001
pmid
27014714
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Elizabeth A. Krupinski Elizabeth A. Krupinski, "Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images," J. Med. Imag. 3(1), 011001 (2016), doi: 10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.011001. Medical Image Perception: Understanding How Radiologists Understand Images Elizabeth A. Krupinski Emory University Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences 1364 Clifton Road NE Atlanta, Georgia 30322 E-mail: ekrupin@emory.edu It is often said that the practice of medicine is both art and science. The interpretation of medical images (e.g., radiology, pathology, cardiology, telemedicine) is no exception and perhaps is even the paragon of this duality. At one level the science part seems obvious--the functioning and capabilities of the human visual system are well known and characterized, as are the basic characteristics, features, and appearance of lesions and other abnormalities in images. Just look for those features and the diagnosis is made. Unfortunately it is not that easy. According to the Institute of Medicine Committee on Quality of Health Care in America, at least 98,000 people die each year from medical errors.1 Image interpretation accounts for a good number of those errors. In fact, error rates in radiology (both false negatives and false positives) have been estimated to be as high as 30% in some areas. An analysis

Journal

Journal of Medical ImagingSPIE

Published: Jan 1, 2016

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