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Image toggling saves time in mammography

Image toggling saves time in mammography Abstract. When two images are perfectly aligned, even subtle differences are readily detected when the images are “toggled” back and forth in the same location. However, substantial changes between two photographs can be missed if the images are misaligned (“change blindness”). Nevertheless, recent work from our lab, testing nonradiologists, suggests that toggling misaligned photographs leads to superior performance compared to side-by-side viewing (SBS). In order to determine if a benefit of toggling misaligned images may be observed in clinical mammography, we developed an image toggling technique where pairs of new and prior breast imaging exam images could be efficiently toggled back and forth. Twenty-three radiologists read 10 mammograms evenly divided in toggle and SBS modes. The toggle mode led to a 6-s benefit in reaching a decision ( t ( 22 ) = 5.11 , p < .05 ). The toggle viewing mode also led to a 5% improvement in diagnostic accuracy, though in our small sample this effect was not statistically reliable. Time savings were found even though successive mammograms were not perfectly aligned. Given the ever-increasing caseload for radiologists, this simple manipulation of how the images are viewed could save valuable time in clinical practice, allowing radiologists to read more cases or spend more time on difficult cases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Imaging SPIE

Image toggling saves time in mammography


When two images are perfectly aligned, even subtle differences are readily detected when the images are "toggled" back and forth in the same location. However, substantial changes between two photographs can be missed if the images are misaligned ("change blindness"). Nevertheless, recent work from our lab, testing nonradiologists, suggests that toggling misaligned photographs leads to superior performance compared to side-by-side viewing (SBS). In order to determine if a benefit of toggling misaligned images may be observed in clinical mammography, we developed an image toggling technique where pairs of new and prior breast imaging exam images could be efficiently toggled back and forth. Twenty-three radiologists read 10 mammograms evenly divided in toggle and SBS modes. The toggle mode led to a 6-s benefit in reaching a decision [t ð22Þ ¼ 5.11, p < .05]. The toggle viewing mode also led to a 5% improvement in diagnostic accuracy, though in our small sample this effect was not statistically reliable. Time savings were found even though successive mammograms were not perfectly aligned. Given the ever-increasing caseload for radiologists, this simple manipulation of how the images are viewed could save valuable time in clinical practice, allowing radiologists to read more cases or spend more time on difficult cases. © 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) [DOI: 10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.011003] Keywords: detection; visual search; perceptual errors; display technology; change blindness. Paper 15138SSR received Jul. 8, 2015; accepted for publication Sep. 9, 2015; published online Oct. 12, 2015. Introduction Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality, and early detection reduces the mortality rate.1 Breast cancer screening in the United States has resulted in an increase in the number of early stage breast cancers that are detected and decreased the number of late-stage cancers detected.1,2...
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Publisher
SPIE
Copyright
© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Subject
Special Section on Medical Image Perception and Observer Performance; Paper
ISSN
2329-4302
eISSN
2329-4310
DOI
10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.011003
pmid
26870746
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. When two images are perfectly aligned, even subtle differences are readily detected when the images are “toggled” back and forth in the same location. However, substantial changes between two photographs can be missed if the images are misaligned (“change blindness”). Nevertheless, recent work from our lab, testing nonradiologists, suggests that toggling misaligned photographs leads to superior performance compared to side-by-side viewing (SBS). In order to determine if a benefit of toggling misaligned images may be observed in clinical mammography, we developed an image toggling technique where pairs of new and prior breast imaging exam images could be efficiently toggled back and forth. Twenty-three radiologists read 10 mammograms evenly divided in toggle and SBS modes. The toggle mode led to a 6-s benefit in reaching a decision ( t ( 22 ) = 5.11 , p < .05 ). The toggle viewing mode also led to a 5% improvement in diagnostic accuracy, though in our small sample this effect was not statistically reliable. Time savings were found even though successive mammograms were not perfectly aligned. Given the ever-increasing caseload for radiologists, this simple manipulation of how the images are viewed could save valuable time in clinical practice, allowing radiologists to read more cases or spend more time on difficult cases.

Journal

Journal of Medical ImagingSPIE

Published: Jan 1, 2016

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