Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Experimental detection of Immunoglobulin G by prism-coupled angular interrogation and a support vector machine

Experimental detection of Immunoglobulin G by prism-coupled angular interrogation and a support... Abstract.A typical prism-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance biosensor comprises a metal thin film in contact with a solution containing an analyte to be sensed. The metal film also acts as a binding surface for bioreceptor molecules to capture and concentrate the analyte molecules of interest. We investigated the use of a porous, anisotropic, periodically non-homogeneous material called a chiral sculptured thin film (CSTF) grown on top of the metal film to confine the solution in its pores. The efficacy of a basic plasmonic sensor was compared with those of two types of sensors containing a CSTF, one type having a metal-nanoparticle layer at a distance of one period from the metal film and the other without that layer. The chosen analyte was Immunoglobulin G and the chosen bioreceptor was Protein A. Measurements were made over a wide angular range rather than over a small range tied to the excitation of a surface-plasmon-polariton wave, and the collected data were used to train a machine-learning algorithm called a support vector machine for classification. We concluded that the metal/CSTF sensor with a metal-nanoparticle layer performs best, the metal-nanoparticle layer being crucial to its better performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Nanophotonics SPIE

Experimental detection of Immunoglobulin G by prism-coupled angular interrogation and a support vector machine

Loading next page...
 
/lp/spie/experimental-detection-of-immunoglobulin-g-by-prism-coupled-angular-Dl2t4TKqum
Publisher
SPIE
Copyright
© 2022 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
ISSN
1934-2608
eISSN
1934-2608
DOI
10.1117/1.jnp.16.016003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract.A typical prism-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance biosensor comprises a metal thin film in contact with a solution containing an analyte to be sensed. The metal film also acts as a binding surface for bioreceptor molecules to capture and concentrate the analyte molecules of interest. We investigated the use of a porous, anisotropic, periodically non-homogeneous material called a chiral sculptured thin film (CSTF) grown on top of the metal film to confine the solution in its pores. The efficacy of a basic plasmonic sensor was compared with those of two types of sensors containing a CSTF, one type having a metal-nanoparticle layer at a distance of one period from the metal film and the other without that layer. The chosen analyte was Immunoglobulin G and the chosen bioreceptor was Protein A. Measurements were made over a wide angular range rather than over a small range tied to the excitation of a surface-plasmon-polariton wave, and the collected data were used to train a machine-learning algorithm called a support vector machine for classification. We concluded that the metal/CSTF sensor with a metal-nanoparticle layer performs best, the metal-nanoparticle layer being crucial to its better performance.

Journal

Journal of NanophotonicsSPIE

Published: Jan 1, 2022

Keywords: biosensing; chiral sculptured thin film; machine learning; prism-coupled configuration; support vector machine; surface plasmon resonance

References