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Demonstration of synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography of infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma of the prostatic urethra in a dog

Demonstration of synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography of infiltrative... Abstract. Prostatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma with prostatic invasion in a dog was imaged with abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography antemortem. Synchrotron in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography (XPCI-CT) was performed on the prostate ex vivo at the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron and compared to histology. XPCI-CT imaging provides greater soft tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging modalities, permitting visualization of regions of inflammatory cell infiltration, differentiation of invasive versus noninvasive tumor regions, and areas of necrosis and mineralization. This represents the first report of XPCI-CT images of an invasive prostatic urothelial neoplasm in a dog. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Imaging SPIE

Demonstration of synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography of infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma of the prostatic urethra in a dog

Demonstration of synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography of infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma of the prostatic urethra in a dog


Prostatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma with prostatic invasion in a dog was imaged with abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography antemortem. Synchrotron in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography (XPCI-CT) was performed on the prostate ex vivo at the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron and compared to histology. XPCI-CT imaging provides greater soft tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging modalities, permitting visualization of regions of inflammatory cell infiltration, differentiation of invasive versus noninvasive tumor regions, and areas of necrosis and mineralization. This represents the first report of XPCI-CT images of an invasive prostatic urothelial neoplasm in a dog. © 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) [DOI: 10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.015504] Keywords: prostate cancer; x-ray phase contrast imaging; computed tomography; transitional cell carcinoma; synchrotron imaging. Paper 15197RR received Oct. 10, 2015; accepted for publication Feb. 25, 2016; published online Mar. 14, 2016. Introduction The basic principles of conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging have not changed dramatically since the first clinical radiographs were acquired in 1896. Image contrast in conventional x-ray imaging techniques depends on the absorption of the x-rays as they pass through tissues with differing linear attenuation coefficients. Soft tissues are difficult to visualize and distinguish from one another in traditional radiographs because they all have similarly low x-ray attenuation coefficients, i.e., they are relativity transparent to x-rays in the diagnostic range, typically 10 to 200 keV.1,2 Lower-energy x-rays improve contrast in soft tissues, but result in increased absorbed doses of radiation to the patient. Conversely, higher-energy x-rays more readily pass through soft tissues (i.e., reduced absorbed dose), but provide less image contrast. Unlike conventional absorption radiography,...
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Publisher
SPIE
Copyright
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Subject
Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment; Paper
ISSN
2329-4302
eISSN
2329-4310
DOI
10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.015504
pmid
27014719
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Prostatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma with prostatic invasion in a dog was imaged with abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography antemortem. Synchrotron in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography (XPCI-CT) was performed on the prostate ex vivo at the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron and compared to histology. XPCI-CT imaging provides greater soft tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging modalities, permitting visualization of regions of inflammatory cell infiltration, differentiation of invasive versus noninvasive tumor regions, and areas of necrosis and mineralization. This represents the first report of XPCI-CT images of an invasive prostatic urothelial neoplasm in a dog.

Journal

Journal of Medical ImagingSPIE

Published: Jan 1, 2016

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