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Cancer cell classification with coherent diffraction imaging using an extreme ultraviolet radiation source

Cancer cell classification with coherent diffraction imaging using an extreme ultraviolet... Abstract. In cancer treatment, it is highly desirable to classify single cancer cells in real time. The standard method is polymerase chain reaction requiring a substantial amount of resources and time. Here, we present an innovative approach for rapidly classifying different cell types: we measure the diffraction pattern of a single cell illuminated with coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser-generated radiation. These patterns allow distinguishing different breast cancer cell types in a subsequent step. Moreover, the morphology of the object can be retrieved from the diffraction pattern with submicron resolution. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we prepared single MCF7 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells on gold-coated silica slides. The output of a laser-driven XUV light source is focused onto a single unstained and unlabeled cancer cell. With the resulting diffraction pattern, we could clearly identify the different cell types. With an improved setup, it will not only be feasible to classify circulating tumor cells with a high throughput, but also to identify smaller objects such as bacteria or even viruses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Imaging SPIE

Cancer cell classification with coherent diffraction imaging using an extreme ultraviolet radiation source

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Publisher
SPIE
Copyright
© The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.
Subject
Special Section Papers; Paper
ISSN
2329-4302
eISSN
2329-4310
DOI
10.1117/1.JMI.1.3.031008
pmid
26158049
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. In cancer treatment, it is highly desirable to classify single cancer cells in real time. The standard method is polymerase chain reaction requiring a substantial amount of resources and time. Here, we present an innovative approach for rapidly classifying different cell types: we measure the diffraction pattern of a single cell illuminated with coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser-generated radiation. These patterns allow distinguishing different breast cancer cell types in a subsequent step. Moreover, the morphology of the object can be retrieved from the diffraction pattern with submicron resolution. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we prepared single MCF7 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells on gold-coated silica slides. The output of a laser-driven XUV light source is focused onto a single unstained and unlabeled cancer cell. With the resulting diffraction pattern, we could clearly identify the different cell types. With an improved setup, it will not only be feasible to classify circulating tumor cells with a high throughput, but also to identify smaller objects such as bacteria or even viruses.

Journal

Journal of Medical ImagingSPIE

Published: Oct 1, 2014

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