Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Debilitative and Facilitative Perception of Trait and State Anxiety and Their Relationships to Self-confidence among Undergraduate Students on a Serial Addition Task

Debilitative and Facilitative Perception of Trait and State Anxiety and Their Relationships to... The first purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the intensity (i.e., level) and direction (i.e., debilitative/facilitative) of state anxiety in predicting a serial addition task performance. Participants rated the degree to which the intensity of each anxiety symptom was either debilitative or facilitative to subsequent performance. The second purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of the intensity and direction of trait anxiety on the intensity and direction of state anxiety. A total of 502 undergraduate students (170 females, 332 males) completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the modified Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2, and each direction scale prior to the task. Performance measures comprised of computational speed, percentage of correct answers, and percentage of correct counted numbers of beep tones. Participants were divided into high/low and debilitative/facilitative groups, based on their intensity and direction scores of trait anxiety. Four groups were created; high-debilitative (n = 256), high-facilitative (n = 93), low-debilitative (n = 31), and low-facilitative (n = 63). The intensity of trait anxiety, state anxiety, cognitive anxiety, and somatic anxiety showed negative linear correlations with each direction of these anxieties. The intensity of self-confidence was negatively correlated with the intensity of trait and state anxieties, whereas, it was positively related to the direction of these anxieties. Unlike previous studies using sport performance, the present cognitive computational task performance measures did not reveal significant relationships with the intensity and direction of these anxieties and self-confidence. Furthermore, there were individual differences in the intensity and direction of trait anxiety, and both the intensity and direction of trait anxiety influenced the intensity and direction of state anxiety separately. These findings systematically replicate previous studies with regard to the significant relationships between the self-report measures of the intensity and direction of trait anxiety, state anxiety, cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety, and self-confidence. Future studies should use another cognitive task with a higher level of difficulty to test the utility of the intensity and direction model of trait and state anxieties in a non-sport performance context. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Advances in Psychology Science and Engineering Publishing Company

Debilitative and Facilitative Perception of Trait and State Anxiety and Their Relationships to Self-confidence among Undergraduate Students on a Serial Addition Task

Loading next page...
 
/lp/science-and-engineering-publishing-company/debilitative-and-facilitative-perception-of-trait-and-state-anxiety-a5lWpioF8E
Publisher
Science and Engineering Publishing Company
Copyright
Science and Engineering Publishing Company
ISSN
2169-494X
eISSN
2169-4958

Abstract

The first purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the intensity (i.e., level) and direction (i.e., debilitative/facilitative) of state anxiety in predicting a serial addition task performance. Participants rated the degree to which the intensity of each anxiety symptom was either debilitative or facilitative to subsequent performance. The second purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of the intensity and direction of trait anxiety on the intensity and direction of state anxiety. A total of 502 undergraduate students (170 females, 332 males) completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the modified Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2, and each direction scale prior to the task. Performance measures comprised of computational speed, percentage of correct answers, and percentage of correct counted numbers of beep tones. Participants were divided into high/low and debilitative/facilitative groups, based on their intensity and direction scores of trait anxiety. Four groups were created; high-debilitative (n = 256), high-facilitative (n = 93), low-debilitative (n = 31), and low-facilitative (n = 63). The intensity of trait anxiety, state anxiety, cognitive anxiety, and somatic anxiety showed negative linear correlations with each direction of these anxieties. The intensity of self-confidence was negatively correlated with the intensity of trait and state anxieties, whereas, it was positively related to the direction of these anxieties. Unlike previous studies using sport performance, the present cognitive computational task performance measures did not reveal significant relationships with the intensity and direction of these anxieties and self-confidence. Furthermore, there were individual differences in the intensity and direction of trait anxiety, and both the intensity and direction of trait anxiety influenced the intensity and direction of state anxiety separately. These findings systematically replicate previous studies with regard to the significant relationships between the self-report measures of the intensity and direction of trait anxiety, state anxiety, cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety, and self-confidence. Future studies should use another cognitive task with a higher level of difficulty to test the utility of the intensity and direction model of trait and state anxieties in a non-sport performance context.

Journal

International Journal of Advances in PsychologyScience and Engineering Publishing Company

Published: Aug 1, 2013

Keywords: State-trait Anxiety, Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety, Self-confidence, Intensity, Direction, Serial Addition Task

There are no references for this article.