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What does the notion of “sovereignty” mean when referring to the digital?

What does the notion of “sovereignty” mean when referring to the digital? This article analyzes how the notion of “sovereignty” has been and is still mobilized in the realm of the digital. This notion is increasingly used to describe various forms of independence, control, and autonomy over digital infrastructures, technologies, and data. Our analysis originates from our previous and current research with activist “tech collectives” where we observed a use of the notion to emphasize alternative technological practices in a way that significantly differs from a governmental policy perspective. In this article, we review several publications in order to show the difference, if not diverging ways in which the notion is being conceptualized, in particular by different groups. We show that while the notion is generally used to assert some form of collective control on digital content and/or infrastructures, the precise interpretations, subjects, meanings, and definitions of sovereignty can significantly differ. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Media & Society SAGE

What does the notion of “sovereignty” mean when referring to the digital?

New Media & Society , Volume 21 (10): 18 – Oct 1, 2019

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References (47)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019
ISSN
1461-4448
eISSN
1461-7315
DOI
10.1177/1461444819865984
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article analyzes how the notion of “sovereignty” has been and is still mobilized in the realm of the digital. This notion is increasingly used to describe various forms of independence, control, and autonomy over digital infrastructures, technologies, and data. Our analysis originates from our previous and current research with activist “tech collectives” where we observed a use of the notion to emphasize alternative technological practices in a way that significantly differs from a governmental policy perspective. In this article, we review several publications in order to show the difference, if not diverging ways in which the notion is being conceptualized, in particular by different groups. We show that while the notion is generally used to assert some form of collective control on digital content and/or infrastructures, the precise interpretations, subjects, meanings, and definitions of sovereignty can significantly differ.

Journal

New Media & SocietySAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2019

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