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Understanding chemical effects in low-load-limit extension of homogeneous charge compression ignition engines via recompression reaction

Understanding chemical effects in low-load-limit extension of homogeneous charge compression... AbstractIn-cylinder pre-processing (or recompression reaction) of pilot-injected fuel during negative value overlap (NVO) has been investigated as a method to extend the low-load limit of residual-effected homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). In an effort to elucidate the chemical and thermal effects involved, model calculations have been performed on the recompression reaction and ignition delay of the recompression products using a reduced n-heptane mechanism (160 reactions, 1424 reactions) and a zero-dimensional kinetics model. Parametric studies were performed to cover possible operating choices for HCCI and to understand their effects on the recompression reaction and mixture ignitability. From the study it is demonstrated that the extent of recompression reaction is limited by chemical kinetics, not thermodynamics, and that residual oxygen during NVO is a determining species for the extent and speciation of the recompression reaction. The recompression product mixture exhibits an overall shorter ignition delay than those of the base fuel, except under lean conditions when significant oxidation during NVO leaves only a small amount of fuel available for main ignition. The thermal consequence of the recompression reaction is also largely dependent on oxygen: at near-stoichiometric conditions, the recompression reaction is endothermic from fuel pyrolysis, whereas at lean conditions, the exothermic recompression reaction becomes dominant. Therefore, the chemical and thermal consequences of the recompression reaction exhibit competing effects on mixture ignitability, which leads to an optimum oxygen concentration (equivalence ratio) for reducing ignition delay and extending HCCI operability. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Engine Research SAGE

Understanding chemical effects in low-load-limit extension of homogeneous charge compression ignition engines via recompression reaction

International Journal of Engine Research , Volume 10 (4): 20 – Aug 1, 2009

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References (14)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2009 Institution of Mechanical Engineers
ISSN
1468-0874
eISSN
2041-3149
DOI
10.1243/14680874JER03409
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn-cylinder pre-processing (or recompression reaction) of pilot-injected fuel during negative value overlap (NVO) has been investigated as a method to extend the low-load limit of residual-effected homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). In an effort to elucidate the chemical and thermal effects involved, model calculations have been performed on the recompression reaction and ignition delay of the recompression products using a reduced n-heptane mechanism (160 reactions, 1424 reactions) and a zero-dimensional kinetics model. Parametric studies were performed to cover possible operating choices for HCCI and to understand their effects on the recompression reaction and mixture ignitability. From the study it is demonstrated that the extent of recompression reaction is limited by chemical kinetics, not thermodynamics, and that residual oxygen during NVO is a determining species for the extent and speciation of the recompression reaction. The recompression product mixture exhibits an overall shorter ignition delay than those of the base fuel, except under lean conditions when significant oxidation during NVO leaves only a small amount of fuel available for main ignition. The thermal consequence of the recompression reaction is also largely dependent on oxygen: at near-stoichiometric conditions, the recompression reaction is endothermic from fuel pyrolysis, whereas at lean conditions, the exothermic recompression reaction becomes dominant. Therefore, the chemical and thermal consequences of the recompression reaction exhibit competing effects on mixture ignitability, which leads to an optimum oxygen concentration (equivalence ratio) for reducing ignition delay and extending HCCI operability.

Journal

International Journal of Engine ResearchSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2009

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