Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Tourists and/as disasters: Rebuilding, remembering, and responsibility in New Orleans

Tourists and/as disasters: Rebuilding, remembering, and responsibility in New Orleans Although some have begun to study the relationships between national disasters and commercial tourism, practices of touring in the aftermath of disasters warrant closer examination. Marita Sturken argues tourists of disaster provide a metaphor for US contemporary culture, epitomizing an attitude that is superficial, distanced, and uncritical. To identify the hopeful possibilities that we can recuperate from literal practices of touring disaster, I turn to the US city of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina made landfall in 2005 to explore the uses of tours as: first responses, lobbying tools, field reports, organizing tactics, and publicity. To contextualize these acts, I engage public discourses of ‘‘Katrina fatigue’’ and the politics of remembering as it relates to post-Katrina tours. From secondary research and participant observation, I then illustrate how non-commercial and commercial tourist practices after a disaster can offer compelling opportunities for rebuilding, more sustainable memories, and political critique. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tourist Studies: An International Journal SAGE

Tourists and/as disasters: Rebuilding, remembering, and responsibility in New Orleans

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/tourists-and-as-disasters-rebuilding-remembering-and-responsibility-in-QknZqIPHAv

References (45)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2010
ISSN
1468-7976
eISSN
1741-3206
DOI
10.1177/1468797609360591
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although some have begun to study the relationships between national disasters and commercial tourism, practices of touring in the aftermath of disasters warrant closer examination. Marita Sturken argues tourists of disaster provide a metaphor for US contemporary culture, epitomizing an attitude that is superficial, distanced, and uncritical. To identify the hopeful possibilities that we can recuperate from literal practices of touring disaster, I turn to the US city of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina made landfall in 2005 to explore the uses of tours as: first responses, lobbying tools, field reports, organizing tactics, and publicity. To contextualize these acts, I engage public discourses of ‘‘Katrina fatigue’’ and the politics of remembering as it relates to post-Katrina tours. From secondary research and participant observation, I then illustrate how non-commercial and commercial tourist practices after a disaster can offer compelling opportunities for rebuilding, more sustainable memories, and political critique.

Journal

Tourist Studies: An International JournalSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.