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Thomas Crofts, Murray Lee, Alyce McGovern and Sanja Milivojevic, Sexting and young people.

Thomas Crofts, Murray Lee, Alyce McGovern and Sanja Milivojevic, Sexting and young people. 150 Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology 50(1) Thomas Crofts, Murray Lee, Alyce McGovern and Sanja Milivojevic, Sexting and young people. Palgrave Macmillan: London, 2015; 263 pp. ISBN 978-1-137-39281-7 E93.59 (hbk) Reviewed by: Claire Meehan, Sociology, University of Auckland, New Zealand Sexting and Young People is marketed primarily to policy makers, academics, educators, school administrators and students. Research has consistently shown that young people spend a significant amount of unsupervised time online (Livingstone & Smith, 2014; Ofcom, 2015). Teenagers increasingly incorporate digital communications into their lives in numerous ways. As mechanisms used for socialising, relaxing and possibly blogging about their daily lives, these new technologies enable young people to live their lives in new ways. This includes their romantic and sexual lives. ‘‘Sexting’’, sending nearly-nude or nude images and videos via smartphones and social media, is a practice amongst young people. Sexting is an area of potential risk of psychological, social, and legal harm for the participants, both for the originators of the images and the recipients, not only as a direct consequence of sending images with no control over any subsequent distribution, but also because of the quasi–legal status of the practice, depending on the age of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology SAGE

Thomas Crofts, Murray Lee, Alyce McGovern and Sanja Milivojevic, Sexting and young people.

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2016
ISSN
0004-8658
eISSN
1837-9273
DOI
10.1177/0004865816662479
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

150 Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology 50(1) Thomas Crofts, Murray Lee, Alyce McGovern and Sanja Milivojevic, Sexting and young people. Palgrave Macmillan: London, 2015; 263 pp. ISBN 978-1-137-39281-7 E93.59 (hbk) Reviewed by: Claire Meehan, Sociology, University of Auckland, New Zealand Sexting and Young People is marketed primarily to policy makers, academics, educators, school administrators and students. Research has consistently shown that young people spend a significant amount of unsupervised time online (Livingstone & Smith, 2014; Ofcom, 2015). Teenagers increasingly incorporate digital communications into their lives in numerous ways. As mechanisms used for socialising, relaxing and possibly blogging about their daily lives, these new technologies enable young people to live their lives in new ways. This includes their romantic and sexual lives. ‘‘Sexting’’, sending nearly-nude or nude images and videos via smartphones and social media, is a practice amongst young people. Sexting is an area of potential risk of psychological, social, and legal harm for the participants, both for the originators of the images and the recipients, not only as a direct consequence of sending images with no control over any subsequent distribution, but also because of the quasi–legal status of the practice, depending on the age of

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of CriminologySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2017

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