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The Job Satisfaction Audit: How to Measure, Interpret, and Use Employee Satisfaction Data

The Job Satisfaction Audit: How to Measure, Interpret, and Use Employee Satisfaction Data American Journal of Small Business, Volume/, Number 1, July, 1976 The Job Satisfaction Audit: How to Measure, Interpret, and Use Employee Satisfaction Data GENE MILBOURN, JR., University of Baltimore J. D. DUNN, North Texas State University This modest paper aims to assist operating managers of small organizations in (I) determining the need for conducting audits of employee attitudes [ 1], (2) selecting an appropriate questionnaire to gather attitudinal data, and, (3) interpreting and using the information collected to improve managerial practices and organizational func· tioning. Job satisfaction is a feeling {approach or avoidance emotion) an employee has about his work, pay, promotional opportunities, supervisor, and co-workers. More specifically, it is the "pleasurable emotional state resulting from the appraisal of one's job as achieving or facilitating the achievement of one's job values [5, p. 316) ." Although global measures of overall satisfaction can be obtained, operating managers have found it more useful to secure workers' feelings toward discriminable facets of overall satisfaction. Through this procedure decision-makers are able to zero-in on pockets of discontent, enabling practical and hard-hitting action to be directed toward dissatisfaction areas. The sources contributing to a low level of overall dissatisfaction can be easily isolated by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Small Business SAGE

The Job Satisfaction Audit: How to Measure, Interpret, and Use Employee Satisfaction Data

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1976 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0363-9428
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1177/104225877600100105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Journal of Small Business, Volume/, Number 1, July, 1976 The Job Satisfaction Audit: How to Measure, Interpret, and Use Employee Satisfaction Data GENE MILBOURN, JR., University of Baltimore J. D. DUNN, North Texas State University This modest paper aims to assist operating managers of small organizations in (I) determining the need for conducting audits of employee attitudes [ 1], (2) selecting an appropriate questionnaire to gather attitudinal data, and, (3) interpreting and using the information collected to improve managerial practices and organizational func· tioning. Job satisfaction is a feeling {approach or avoidance emotion) an employee has about his work, pay, promotional opportunities, supervisor, and co-workers. More specifically, it is the "pleasurable emotional state resulting from the appraisal of one's job as achieving or facilitating the achievement of one's job values [5, p. 316) ." Although global measures of overall satisfaction can be obtained, operating managers have found it more useful to secure workers' feelings toward discriminable facets of overall satisfaction. Through this procedure decision-makers are able to zero-in on pockets of discontent, enabling practical and hard-hitting action to be directed toward dissatisfaction areas. The sources contributing to a low level of overall dissatisfaction can be easily isolated by

Journal

American Journal of Small BusinessSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 1976

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