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The Family Curriculum: Socialisation Process, Family Network and the Negotiation of Police Identities

The Family Curriculum: Socialisation Process, Family Network and the... AbstractThis article analyses how recruits' learning is filtered through their personalsocial network, with the aim of understanding the role of this network in policeeducation. Based on 68 interviews with recruits about their familyrelationships, this analysis demonstrates that both relatives and the policeacademy effectively combine to groom candidates for the rank of officer in theBrazilian Military Police. Narratives from recruits about family strategies toprevent recruits from leaving the academy are analysed, demonstrating theimportance of how the family both resists and adapts to its offspring's newrole. For a considerable portion of lower-middle-class and non-white recruits'families, the police academy offers an important opportunity for one of itsmembers to gain entry into the labour market. According to interviewees, thefamilial social network operates as a supplementary curriculum and affectivebackground that prevents recruits from losing heart and provides them withpsychological comfort in a demanding environment. For recruits, theparticipation of their relatives in socialisation proves to be essential toneutralising negative aspects of the police identity and learning process. Wealso conclude that instead of being an outcome of a dyadic or dual relationship— between the recruits and the police academy — the policehabitus is also shaped by a third player represented by the recruits' familialsocial network, which provides recruits with a support role that the policeacademy and its official curriculum cannot offer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology SAGE

The Family Curriculum: Socialisation Process, Family Network and the Negotiation of Police Identities

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0004-8658
eISSN
1837-9273
DOI
10.1375/acri.39.2.248
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis article analyses how recruits' learning is filtered through their personalsocial network, with the aim of understanding the role of this network in policeeducation. Based on 68 interviews with recruits about their familyrelationships, this analysis demonstrates that both relatives and the policeacademy effectively combine to groom candidates for the rank of officer in theBrazilian Military Police. Narratives from recruits about family strategies toprevent recruits from leaving the academy are analysed, demonstrating theimportance of how the family both resists and adapts to its offspring's newrole. For a considerable portion of lower-middle-class and non-white recruits'families, the police academy offers an important opportunity for one of itsmembers to gain entry into the labour market. According to interviewees, thefamilial social network operates as a supplementary curriculum and affectivebackground that prevents recruits from losing heart and provides them withpsychological comfort in a demanding environment. For recruits, theparticipation of their relatives in socialisation proves to be essential toneutralising negative aspects of the police identity and learning process. Wealso conclude that instead of being an outcome of a dyadic or dual relationship— between the recruits and the police academy — the policehabitus is also shaped by a third player represented by the recruits' familialsocial network, which provides recruits with a support role that the policeacademy and its official curriculum cannot offer.

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of CriminologySAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2006

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