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The Business of Mass Migration: Fear, Exploitation, and the Political Economy of Immigration Restriction

The Business of Mass Migration: Fear, Exploitation, and the Political Economy of Immigration... U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials temporarily suspended operations at the San Ysidro port of entry in San Diego, CA, November 2018. U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Flickr 838819 NLFXXX10.1177/1095796019838819New Labor ForumClark research-article2019 New Labor Forum 2019, Vol. 28(2) 26 –34 The Business of Mass Migration: Copyright © 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies Article reuse guidelines: Fear, Exploitation, and the sagepub.com/journals-permissions https://doi.org/10.1177/1095796019838819 DOI: 10.1177/1095796019838819 Political Economy of journals.sagepub.com/home/nlf Immigration Restriction Gabrielle E. Clark Keywords immigrant workers, labor, neoliberalism, capitalism, globalization On November 8, following a military buildup at immigrant population in the United States, with the United States’ Southwest border, Trump’s Honduran migrants constituting 2.5 percent of Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued the 43.7 million foreign-born (comparatively, an interim rule mandating that asylum seekers Cubans constitute 3 percent and Indians 5.6 from Central America enter the United States at percent). In contrast, Mexicans are the largest official ports of entry for processing. To do oth- group of immigrants in the United States, at erwise, as Trump proclaimed the following day, 11.6 million people (currently 26 percent of will be considered an “unlawful entry” barring U.S. immigrants). This sizeable population is migrants from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Labor Forum SAGE

The Business of Mass Migration: Fear, Exploitation, and the Political Economy of Immigration Restriction

New Labor Forum , Volume 28 (2): 9 – May 1, 2019

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies
ISSN
1095-7960
eISSN
1557-2978
DOI
10.1177/1095796019838819
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials temporarily suspended operations at the San Ysidro port of entry in San Diego, CA, November 2018. U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Flickr 838819 NLFXXX10.1177/1095796019838819New Labor ForumClark research-article2019 New Labor Forum 2019, Vol. 28(2) 26 –34 The Business of Mass Migration: Copyright © 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies Article reuse guidelines: Fear, Exploitation, and the sagepub.com/journals-permissions https://doi.org/10.1177/1095796019838819 DOI: 10.1177/1095796019838819 Political Economy of journals.sagepub.com/home/nlf Immigration Restriction Gabrielle E. Clark Keywords immigrant workers, labor, neoliberalism, capitalism, globalization On November 8, following a military buildup at immigrant population in the United States, with the United States’ Southwest border, Trump’s Honduran migrants constituting 2.5 percent of Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued the 43.7 million foreign-born (comparatively, an interim rule mandating that asylum seekers Cubans constitute 3 percent and Indians 5.6 from Central America enter the United States at percent). In contrast, Mexicans are the largest official ports of entry for processing. To do oth- group of immigrants in the United States, at erwise, as Trump proclaimed the following day, 11.6 million people (currently 26 percent of will be considered an “unlawful entry” barring U.S. immigrants). This sizeable population is migrants from

Journal

New Labor ForumSAGE

Published: May 1, 2019

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