Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Association between Grandmaternal Investment and Early Years Overweight in the UK:

The Association between Grandmaternal Investment and Early Years Overweight in the UK: Previous studies show that in many pre-modern and traditional populations the presence of a grandmother correlates with increased child survival rates, maybe as a result of improved child nutrition. Grandmaternal investment aimed at improving grandchildren's nutritional status in subsistence societies may have different outcomes in contemporary affluent societies. Using the British Millennium Cohort Study I investigate the association between maternal and paternal grandmothers' childcare and early years overweight in the UK. Results show that children who were cared for mainly by their grandmothers between the ages of 9 months and 3 years were more likely overweight at age 3 than children who were cared for by their parents. My results are in line with Pearce, Abbas, Ferguson, Graham, and Law (2010), although they did not distinguish grandmothers by lineage. Grandmothers may influence children's nutritional status in contemporary societies, but as with many evolved behavioral strategies the outcome may be no longer beneficial. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Psychology SAGE

The Association between Grandmaternal Investment and Early Years Overweight in the UK:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 11 (2): 1 – Apr 1, 2013

The Association between Grandmaternal Investment and Early Years Overweight in the UK:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 11 (2): 1 – Apr 1, 2013

Abstract

Previous studies show that in many pre-modern and traditional populations the presence of a grandmother correlates with increased child survival rates, maybe as a result of improved child nutrition. Grandmaternal investment aimed at improving grandchildren's nutritional status in subsistence societies may have different outcomes in contemporary affluent societies. Using the British Millennium Cohort Study I investigate the association between maternal and paternal grandmothers' childcare and early years overweight in the UK. Results show that children who were cared for mainly by their grandmothers between the ages of 9 months and 3 years were more likely overweight at age 3 than children who were cared for by their parents. My results are in line with Pearce, Abbas, Ferguson, Graham, and Law (2010), although they did not distinguish grandmothers by lineage. Grandmothers may influence children's nutritional status in contemporary societies, but as with many evolved behavioral strategies the outcome may be no longer beneficial.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/the-association-between-grandmaternal-investment-and-early-years-uVQc2G30Th
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Inc., unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
1474-7049
eISSN
1474-7049
DOI
10.1177/147470491301100212
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous studies show that in many pre-modern and traditional populations the presence of a grandmother correlates with increased child survival rates, maybe as a result of improved child nutrition. Grandmaternal investment aimed at improving grandchildren's nutritional status in subsistence societies may have different outcomes in contemporary affluent societies. Using the British Millennium Cohort Study I investigate the association between maternal and paternal grandmothers' childcare and early years overweight in the UK. Results show that children who were cared for mainly by their grandmothers between the ages of 9 months and 3 years were more likely overweight at age 3 than children who were cared for by their parents. My results are in line with Pearce, Abbas, Ferguson, Graham, and Law (2010), although they did not distinguish grandmothers by lineage. Grandmothers may influence children's nutritional status in contemporary societies, but as with many evolved behavioral strategies the outcome may be no longer beneficial.

Journal

Evolutionary PsychologySAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2013

Keywords: childcare; grandparental investment; lineage; Millennium Cohort Study; obesity; overweight

References