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The American Marketing Society

The American Marketing Society HE AMERICAN MARKETING SOCIETY was organized in 1931 to promote the scientific study of distribution, to encourage improvement of methods and reduction of costs, and to disseminate sound information necessary for a proper understanding of mar­ keting organization and practices. Judged from various standpoints, marketing operations constitute an extremely impor­ tant portion of our economic activity. The total cost of performing the functions that are involved in moving goods from producer to consumer is indicated by the fact that ac­ cording to the census of distribution, it cost over $12,000,000,000 to operate retail stores in 1929, and over $6,000,000,000 to operate wholesale houses. And there are many other distribution expenses in addition. Marketing expenses necessarily constitute an important proportion of final retail prices; and many millions of people earn their livelihood from participation in marketing activities. These facts pertaining to costs do not measure in any way the efficiency or inefficiency of the marketing system. The process of getting goods from producer to consumer is for most commodities more complicated, and involves more human labor than primary pro­ duction in the factory or on the farm. But these facts serve to indicate the important field of economic activity to which the American Marketing Society devotes itself. Only within the last twenty years has the marketing process been subjected to scien­ tific study and analysis. The American Marketing Society aims to further this work by promoting the interchange of experiences and ideas among its members; by encoumging research; by holding public conferences on vital and timely subjects; and by adding to our knowledge of fundamental principles and underlying trends through contributions to the AMERICAN MARKETING JOURNAL. The membership of the Society consists of sales executives, teachers of marketing, marketing research men, and others whose interests lie primarily in this field. Local sections have been established in a number of cities and these sections hold monthly lunch­ eon or dinner meetings for informal talks or discussion of papers. Constructive work is being carried on largely through special committees, which devote themselves to such sub­ jects as marketing costs, research technique, retail problems, industrial marketing, etc. The annual meetings of the Society take place in December of each year, and if the pres­ ent policy is adhered to in the future, they will usually be held in conjunction with the meetings of the American Economic Association, the American Statistical Association, the National Association of Teachers of Marketing and Advertising, and various other organizations. The need for this organization is obvious ; its vitality is a source of gratification to the executives who have given their time and attention to its development. Its sphere of in­ fluence is widening, and it gives promise of becoming an influential and powerful organ· ·ization in this most important phase of our economic life. L. D. H. WELD, President http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Marketing Journal SAGE

The American Marketing Society

American Marketing Journal , Volume amj-1 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1934

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1934 American Marketing Association
ISSN
0193-1806
eISSN
1547-7185
DOI
10.1177/002224293400100102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HE AMERICAN MARKETING SOCIETY was organized in 1931 to promote the scientific study of distribution, to encourage improvement of methods and reduction of costs, and to disseminate sound information necessary for a proper understanding of mar­ keting organization and practices. Judged from various standpoints, marketing operations constitute an extremely impor­ tant portion of our economic activity. The total cost of performing the functions that are involved in moving goods from producer to consumer is indicated by the fact that ac­ cording to the census of distribution, it cost over $12,000,000,000 to operate retail stores in 1929, and over $6,000,000,000 to operate wholesale houses. And there are many other distribution expenses in addition. Marketing expenses necessarily constitute an important proportion of final retail prices; and many millions of people earn their livelihood from participation in marketing activities. These facts pertaining to costs do not measure in any way the efficiency or inefficiency of the marketing system. The process of getting goods from producer to consumer is for most commodities more complicated, and involves more human labor than primary pro­ duction in the factory or on the farm. But these facts serve to indicate the important field of economic activity to which the American Marketing Society devotes itself. Only within the last twenty years has the marketing process been subjected to scien­ tific study and analysis. The American Marketing Society aims to further this work by promoting the interchange of experiences and ideas among its members; by encoumging research; by holding public conferences on vital and timely subjects; and by adding to our knowledge of fundamental principles and underlying trends through contributions to the AMERICAN MARKETING JOURNAL. The membership of the Society consists of sales executives, teachers of marketing, marketing research men, and others whose interests lie primarily in this field. Local sections have been established in a number of cities and these sections hold monthly lunch­ eon or dinner meetings for informal talks or discussion of papers. Constructive work is being carried on largely through special committees, which devote themselves to such sub­ jects as marketing costs, research technique, retail problems, industrial marketing, etc. The annual meetings of the Society take place in December of each year, and if the pres­ ent policy is adhered to in the future, they will usually be held in conjunction with the meetings of the American Economic Association, the American Statistical Association, the National Association of Teachers of Marketing and Advertising, and various other organizations. The need for this organization is obvious ; its vitality is a source of gratification to the executives who have given their time and attention to its development. Its sphere of in­ fluence is widening, and it gives promise of becoming an influential and powerful organ· ·ization in this most important phase of our economic life. L. D. H. WELD, President

Journal

American Marketing JournalSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1934

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