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Testing Predictions from the Hunter-Gatherer Hypothesis — 2: Sex Differences in the Visual Processing of near and Far Space:

Testing Predictions from the Hunter-Gatherer Hypothesis — 2: Sex Differences in the Visual... Here, in the second of two linked reports, we focus on sex differences in visual processing. Study 1 presented a time estimation task in virtual space and generated the predicted Space*Sex interaction with men performing significantly better in far than in near space. Study 2 used a laboratory-based puzzle completion task in which participants saw their hands and the puzzle in far or near space. This time women performed significantly better in near than far space. Study 3 simplified the puzzle completion task. Once again the predicted Space*Sex interaction was significant but with both sexes showing significantly different performances: women better in near, men in far space. These findings are compatible with an evolutionary origin as predicted by the hunter-gatherer hypothesis. Far and near space are processed in the ventral and dorsal streams, two cortical regions more widely known as the “what” and “where” visual systems. To those traditional descriptions we suggest adding that the two streams are sex-dimorphic, with the ventral “there” system interacting with far space and favored in men and the dorsal “here” system interacting with near space and favored in women. Future studies of visual systems should consider the impact of sex differences and the spatial location of stimulus presentations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Psychology SAGE

Testing Predictions from the Hunter-Gatherer Hypothesis — 2: Sex Differences in the Visual Processing of near and Far Space:

Testing Predictions from the Hunter-Gatherer Hypothesis — 2: Sex Differences in the Visual Processing of near and Far Space:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 5 (3): 1 – Jul 1, 2007

Abstract

Here, in the second of two linked reports, we focus on sex differences in visual processing. Study 1 presented a time estimation task in virtual space and generated the predicted Space*Sex interaction with men performing significantly better in far than in near space. Study 2 used a laboratory-based puzzle completion task in which participants saw their hands and the puzzle in far or near space. This time women performed significantly better in near than far space. Study 3 simplified the puzzle completion task. Once again the predicted Space*Sex interaction was significant but with both sexes showing significantly different performances: women better in near, men in far space. These findings are compatible with an evolutionary origin as predicted by the hunter-gatherer hypothesis. Far and near space are processed in the ventral and dorsal streams, two cortical regions more widely known as the “what” and “where” visual systems. To those traditional descriptions we suggest adding that the two streams are sex-dimorphic, with the ventral “there” system interacting with far space and favored in men and the dorsal “here” system interacting with near space and favored in women. Future studies of visual systems should consider the impact of sex differences and the spatial location of stimulus presentations.

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Inc., unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
1474-7049
eISSN
1474-7049
DOI
10.1177/147470490700500314
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Here, in the second of two linked reports, we focus on sex differences in visual processing. Study 1 presented a time estimation task in virtual space and generated the predicted Space*Sex interaction with men performing significantly better in far than in near space. Study 2 used a laboratory-based puzzle completion task in which participants saw their hands and the puzzle in far or near space. This time women performed significantly better in near than far space. Study 3 simplified the puzzle completion task. Once again the predicted Space*Sex interaction was significant but with both sexes showing significantly different performances: women better in near, men in far space. These findings are compatible with an evolutionary origin as predicted by the hunter-gatherer hypothesis. Far and near space are processed in the ventral and dorsal streams, two cortical regions more widely known as the “what” and “where” visual systems. To those traditional descriptions we suggest adding that the two streams are sex-dimorphic, with the ventral “there” system interacting with far space and favored in men and the dorsal “here” system interacting with near space and favored in women. Future studies of visual systems should consider the impact of sex differences and the spatial location of stimulus presentations.

Journal

Evolutionary PsychologySAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2007

Keywords: hunter-gatherer hypothesis; sex differences; visual processing; far and near space; dorsal and ventral cortical streams; two visual systems

References