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Temporal Aspects of Stimulus-Driven Attending in Dynamic Arrays

Temporal Aspects of Stimulus-Driven Attending in Dynamic Arrays Auditory sequences of tones were used to examine a form of stimulus-driven attending that involves temporal expectancies and is influenced by stimulus rhythm. Three experiments examined the influence of sequence timing on comparative pitch judgments of two tones (standard, comparison) separated by interpolated pitches. In two of the experiments, interpolated tones were regularly timed, with onset times of comparison tones varied relative to this rhythm. Listeners were most accurate judging the pitch of rhythmically expected tones and least accurate with very unexpected ones. This effect persisted over time, but disappeared when the rhythm of interpolated tones was either missing or irregular. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Science SAGE

Temporal Aspects of Stimulus-Driven Attending in Dynamic Arrays

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References (32)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2002 Association for Psychological Science
ISSN
0956-7976
eISSN
1467-9280
DOI
10.1111/1467-9280.00458
pmid
12137133
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Auditory sequences of tones were used to examine a form of stimulus-driven attending that involves temporal expectancies and is influenced by stimulus rhythm. Three experiments examined the influence of sequence timing on comparative pitch judgments of two tones (standard, comparison) separated by interpolated pitches. In two of the experiments, interpolated tones were regularly timed, with onset times of comparison tones varied relative to this rhythm. Listeners were most accurate judging the pitch of rhythmically expected tones and least accurate with very unexpected ones. This effect persisted over time, but disappeared when the rhythm of interpolated tones was either missing or irregular.

Journal

Psychological ScienceSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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