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State of Exception

State of Exception space and culture/august 2005 perhaps one of the most serious omissions is any sustained engagement with the con- cept of embodiment, which is arguably central to any understanding of mobile and mediated spaces. Schwarzer argues that the “zoomscape” is a “largely optical mode of perception characterized by speed and surface” (p. 1). As a result, he says that the “lin- guistic model” of architectural interpretation has to be supplemented by a “percep- tual” model, which he feels is largely disembodied and visual (p. 20). The distinction he makes between the linguistic and the perceptual is not clear, and he never develops this argument. However, by assuming that “nonvisual senses, especially touch” (p. 20) play a diminishing role in this “perceptual” model, Schwarzer’s presentation down- plays what may very well be the most crucial and novel aspect for understanding cul- tural and social dynamics in the “zoomscape”: the control of the body through pre- cognitive, sensory, and emotive registers. —Charles O’Hara Toronto, Canada State of Exception, by Giorgio Agamben (K. Attell, Trans.) (2005). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. DOI: 10.1177/1206331205277395 The sequel to Agamben’s Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life, State of Ex- ception traces the idea of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Space and Culture SAGE

State of Exception

Space and Culture , Volume 8 (3): 5 – Aug 1, 2005

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1206-3312
eISSN
1552-8308
DOI
10.1177/1206331205277395
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

space and culture/august 2005 perhaps one of the most serious omissions is any sustained engagement with the con- cept of embodiment, which is arguably central to any understanding of mobile and mediated spaces. Schwarzer argues that the “zoomscape” is a “largely optical mode of perception characterized by speed and surface” (p. 1). As a result, he says that the “lin- guistic model” of architectural interpretation has to be supplemented by a “percep- tual” model, which he feels is largely disembodied and visual (p. 20). The distinction he makes between the linguistic and the perceptual is not clear, and he never develops this argument. However, by assuming that “nonvisual senses, especially touch” (p. 20) play a diminishing role in this “perceptual” model, Schwarzer’s presentation down- plays what may very well be the most crucial and novel aspect for understanding cul- tural and social dynamics in the “zoomscape”: the control of the body through pre- cognitive, sensory, and emotive registers. —Charles O’Hara Toronto, Canada State of Exception, by Giorgio Agamben (K. Attell, Trans.) (2005). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. DOI: 10.1177/1206331205277395 The sequel to Agamben’s Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life, State of Ex- ception traces the idea of a

Journal

Space and CultureSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2005

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