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Socioeconomic Status, Marital Status Continuity and Change, Marital Conflict, and Mortality

Socioeconomic Status, Marital Status Continuity and Change, Marital Conflict, and Mortality Objective: The authors investigated (a) whether being continuously married compared with other marital status trajectories over 5 years attenuates the adverse effects of lower education and lower income on longevity, (b) whether being in higher conflict as well as lower conflict marriage compared with being single provides a buffer against socioeconomic status inequalities in mortality, and (c) whether the conditional effects of marital factors on the SES—mortality association vary by gender. Method: The authors estimated logistic regression models with data from adults aged 30 or above who participated in the National Survey of Families and Households 1987— 2002. Results: Being continuously married, compared with being continuously never married or making a transition to separation/divorce, buffered mortality risks among men with low income. Mortality risk for low-income men was also lower in higher conflict marriages compared with being never married or previously married. Discussion: Marriage ameliorates mortality risks for some low-income men. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aging and Health SAGE

Socioeconomic Status, Marital Status Continuity and Change, Marital Conflict, and Mortality

Journal of Aging and Health , Volume 23 (4): 29 – Jun 1, 2011

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References (43)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2011
ISSN
0898-2643
eISSN
1552-6887
DOI
10.1177/0898264310393339
pmid
21273502
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective: The authors investigated (a) whether being continuously married compared with other marital status trajectories over 5 years attenuates the adverse effects of lower education and lower income on longevity, (b) whether being in higher conflict as well as lower conflict marriage compared with being single provides a buffer against socioeconomic status inequalities in mortality, and (c) whether the conditional effects of marital factors on the SES—mortality association vary by gender. Method: The authors estimated logistic regression models with data from adults aged 30 or above who participated in the National Survey of Families and Households 1987— 2002. Results: Being continuously married, compared with being continuously never married or making a transition to separation/divorce, buffered mortality risks among men with low income. Mortality risk for low-income men was also lower in higher conflict marriages compared with being never married or previously married. Discussion: Marriage ameliorates mortality risks for some low-income men.

Journal

Journal of Aging and HealthSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2011

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