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Socialism and Penal Policy: A Reply to Hawkins

Socialism and Penal Policy: A Reply to Hawkins AUST & NZ JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY (March 1985) 18 (41-48) 41 David Brown* and George Zdenkowskit Introduction Gordon Hawkins' entry into debate over issues of penal policy in the Australian context is warmly welcomed. One of our previous criticisms of the work of Hawkins has been his reluctance to address and intervene in, local debates, struggles and politics. In his constructive criticisms in "Socialism and Penal Policy'? of "some assumptions shared by many penal reformers" which he argues "are both theoretically unsound and counter-productive in practice" Hawkins appears to have broken with a stream of Australian penology which has analysed the Attica revolt, but not those at Bathurst, Yatala or Boggo Road; has evinced concern about the Soviet Gulag, but not Grafton, Goulburn or Pentridge.I Our necessarily brief response to his paper is offered in the spirit of positive engagement which we hope will open rather than close debate. An Australian Debate: not all roads lead to Moscow Firstly, Hawkins in reviewing The Prison Struggle argues that "some explanation should be offered of the fact that contemporary socialist societies. . . do not appear to be notably more humane in their treatment of prisoners than capitalist societies with their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology SAGE

Socialism and Penal Policy: A Reply to Hawkins

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0004-8658
eISSN
1837-9273
DOI
10.1177/000486588501800105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AUST & NZ JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY (March 1985) 18 (41-48) 41 David Brown* and George Zdenkowskit Introduction Gordon Hawkins' entry into debate over issues of penal policy in the Australian context is warmly welcomed. One of our previous criticisms of the work of Hawkins has been his reluctance to address and intervene in, local debates, struggles and politics. In his constructive criticisms in "Socialism and Penal Policy'? of "some assumptions shared by many penal reformers" which he argues "are both theoretically unsound and counter-productive in practice" Hawkins appears to have broken with a stream of Australian penology which has analysed the Attica revolt, but not those at Bathurst, Yatala or Boggo Road; has evinced concern about the Soviet Gulag, but not Grafton, Goulburn or Pentridge.I Our necessarily brief response to his paper is offered in the spirit of positive engagement which we hope will open rather than close debate. An Australian Debate: not all roads lead to Moscow Firstly, Hawkins in reviewing The Prison Struggle argues that "some explanation should be offered of the fact that contemporary socialist societies. . . do not appear to be notably more humane in their treatment of prisoners than capitalist societies with their

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of CriminologySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1985

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