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Religious Belief, Coalitional Commitment, and Support for Suicide Attacks: Response to Liddle, J.R., Machluf, K., and Shackelford, T.K. (this issue). Understanding suicide terrorism: Premature dismissal of the religious-belief hypothesis

Religious Belief, Coalitional Commitment, and Support for Suicide Attacks: Response to Liddle,... Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2010. 8(3): 346-349 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Commentary Religious Belief, Coalitional Commitment, and Support for Suicide Attacks Response to Liddle, J.R., Machluf, K., and Shackelford, T.K. (this issue). Understanding suicide terrorism: Premature dismissal of the religious-belief hypothesis. Jeremy Ginges, Department of Psychology, The New School for Social Research, New York, NY, USA. Email: gingesj@newschool.edu (Corresponding author). Ian Hansen, Department of Behavioral Sciences, York College, Brooklyn, NY, USA. Ara Norenzayan, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. “Faith is an evil precisely because it requires no justification and brooks no argument. Teaching children that unquestioned faith is a virtue primes them ... to grow up into potentially lethal weapons for future jihads or crusades” (Dawkins, 2006, p. 305). In Ginges, Hansen and Norenzayan (2009; GHN), we presented studies investigating the relationship between religion and popular support for suicide attacks. We identified two possible reasons why religious groups carrying out suicide attacks might find it easier to obtain popular support from communities they are seeking to represent. The first we termed the religious belief hypothesis. This hypothesis, neatly encapsulated by the above quote from Richard Dawkins, is that devotion to religious belief itself encourages suicide attacks, because, for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Psychology SAGE

Religious Belief, Coalitional Commitment, and Support for Suicide Attacks: Response to Liddle, J.R., Machluf, K., and Shackelford, T.K. (this issue). Understanding suicide terrorism: Premature dismissal of the religious-belief hypothesis

Religious Belief, Coalitional Commitment, and Support for Suicide Attacks: Response to Liddle, J.R., Machluf, K., and Shackelford, T.K. (this issue). Understanding suicide terrorism: Premature dismissal of the religious-belief hypothesis

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 8 (3): 1 – Jul 1, 2010

Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2010. 8(3): 346-349 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Commentary Religious Belief, Coalitional Commitment, and Support for Suicide Attacks Response to Liddle, J.R., Machluf, K., and Shackelford, T.K. (this issue). Understanding suicide terrorism: Premature dismissal of the religious-belief hypothesis. Jeremy Ginges, Department of Psychology, The New School for Social Research, New York, NY, USA. Email: gingesj@newschool.edu (Corresponding author). Ian Hansen, Department of Behavioral Sciences, York College, Brooklyn, NY, USA. Ara Norenzayan, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. “Faith is an evil precisely because it requires no justification and brooks no argument. Teaching children that unquestioned faith is a virtue primes them ... to grow up into potentially lethal weapons for future jihads or crusades” (Dawkins, 2006, p. 305). In Ginges, Hansen and Norenzayan (2009; GHN), we presented studies investigating the relationship between religion and popular support for suicide attacks. We identified two possible reasons why religious groups carrying out suicide attacks might find it easier to obtain popular support from communities they are seeking to represent. The first we termed the religious belief hypothesis. This hypothesis, neatly encapsulated by the above quote from Richard Dawkins, is that devotion to religious belief itself encourages suicide attacks, because, for

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SAGE
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ISSN
1474-7049
eISSN
1474-7049
DOI
10.1177/147470491000800303
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Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2010. 8(3): 346-349 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Commentary Religious Belief, Coalitional Commitment, and Support for Suicide Attacks Response to Liddle, J.R., Machluf, K., and Shackelford, T.K. (this issue). Understanding suicide terrorism: Premature dismissal of the religious-belief hypothesis. Jeremy Ginges, Department of Psychology, The New School for Social Research, New York, NY, USA. Email: gingesj@newschool.edu (Corresponding author). Ian Hansen, Department of Behavioral Sciences, York College, Brooklyn, NY, USA. Ara Norenzayan, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. “Faith is an evil precisely because it requires no justification and brooks no argument. Teaching children that unquestioned faith is a virtue primes them ... to grow up into potentially lethal weapons for future jihads or crusades” (Dawkins, 2006, p. 305). In Ginges, Hansen and Norenzayan (2009; GHN), we presented studies investigating the relationship between religion and popular support for suicide attacks. We identified two possible reasons why religious groups carrying out suicide attacks might find it easier to obtain popular support from communities they are seeking to represent. The first we termed the religious belief hypothesis. This hypothesis, neatly encapsulated by the above quote from Richard Dawkins, is that devotion to religious belief itself encourages suicide attacks, because, for

Journal

Evolutionary PsychologySAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2010

References