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Putting the Organized Crime and Corruption Debate in Perspective

Putting the Organized Crime and Corruption Debate in Perspective AUST & NZ JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY (March 1985) 18 (1-2) 1 EDITORIAL Three New South Wales criminologists, David Brown, Russell Hogg and Richard Phillipps have very recently put together under the title "Not the National Times" a series of essays and letters, some already published, around the theme of organized crime and corruption, with special emphasis on the Costigan Royal Commission, the state of the legal system in New South Wales and the treatment of these issues by the media, in particular a series of articles in the National Times. Their contribution is a modest but extremely timely and useful one. The general point they make is that the level of criminological debate on these issues in Australia is poor and skewed in the wrong directions. Their specific message is that the responses to the issues of organized crime and corruption in Australia have failed to consider pr..oblems from first principles and from the broadest possible economic, political and social perspectives. Brown, Hogg and Phillipps focus on the National Times because of the major impact which that newspaper has made in calling much of the tune of the current debate in the wake of the Costigan Commission and allegations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology SAGE

Putting the Organized Crime and Corruption Debate in Perspective

Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology , Volume 18 (1): 2 – Mar 1, 1985

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0004-8658
eISSN
1837-9273
DOI
10.1177/000486588501800101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AUST & NZ JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY (March 1985) 18 (1-2) 1 EDITORIAL Three New South Wales criminologists, David Brown, Russell Hogg and Richard Phillipps have very recently put together under the title "Not the National Times" a series of essays and letters, some already published, around the theme of organized crime and corruption, with special emphasis on the Costigan Royal Commission, the state of the legal system in New South Wales and the treatment of these issues by the media, in particular a series of articles in the National Times. Their contribution is a modest but extremely timely and useful one. The general point they make is that the level of criminological debate on these issues in Australia is poor and skewed in the wrong directions. Their specific message is that the responses to the issues of organized crime and corruption in Australia have failed to consider pr..oblems from first principles and from the broadest possible economic, political and social perspectives. Brown, Hogg and Phillipps focus on the National Times because of the major impact which that newspaper has made in calling much of the tune of the current debate in the wake of the Costigan Commission and allegations

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of CriminologySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1985

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