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On the Job Conflict

On the Job Conflict HOW TO SURVIVE by Carol A. Bacon, as, RN, COHN lash es with personal beliefs often catch Conflicts like these are not the result of mis­ individuals by surprise. For example, a understandings; they arise from clashes between nurse may for years assume that every deep seated, sincere, but diametrically opposed other nurse agrees with deeply held values. Sud­ views. Once values are internalized, they are not denly a new member of an organization or a easily changed-certainly not just because a new the belief by which one lives. coworker challenges manager comes on board or because one encoun­ Consider these examples: ters new colleagues. • A newly employed nurse believes that excel­ lence in care is the highest professional virtue. IDENTIFYING BELIEFS This nurse learns, however, "that's not what It helps to be prepared with a clear understand­ counts in this office." The motto of the manager is ing of what one believes in as conflict situations "to get the job done and get it done quickly, no arise. This involves a personal search through extra education or information exchanges." The which one identifies and eventually accepts those nurse finds that those who are rewarded are those beliefs http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AAOHN Journal SAGE

On the Job Conflict

AAOHN Journal , Volume 41 (11): 4 – Nov 1, 1993

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1993 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses
ISSN
0891-0162
DOI
10.1177/216507999304101103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HOW TO SURVIVE by Carol A. Bacon, as, RN, COHN lash es with personal beliefs often catch Conflicts like these are not the result of mis­ individuals by surprise. For example, a understandings; they arise from clashes between nurse may for years assume that every deep seated, sincere, but diametrically opposed other nurse agrees with deeply held values. Sud­ views. Once values are internalized, they are not denly a new member of an organization or a easily changed-certainly not just because a new the belief by which one lives. coworker challenges manager comes on board or because one encoun­ Consider these examples: ters new colleagues. • A newly employed nurse believes that excel­ lence in care is the highest professional virtue. IDENTIFYING BELIEFS This nurse learns, however, "that's not what It helps to be prepared with a clear understand­ counts in this office." The motto of the manager is ing of what one believes in as conflict situations "to get the job done and get it done quickly, no arise. This involves a personal search through extra education or information exchanges." The which one identifies and eventually accepts those nurse finds that those who are rewarded are those beliefs

Journal

AAOHN JournalSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 1993

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